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Auditorium Concordia
Polissena A Hall
Polissena B Hall
Room 3
13:30
14:00
14:30
15:00
15:30
16:00
16:30
17:00
17:30
18:00
18:30
19:00
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13:30 - 16:00 | Special Session

Incontro Scuole RaccontART

16:30 - 17:15 | Satellite Symposium

Reflecting on treatment strategies to achieve long-term treatment success in HIV

17:20 - 20:00

ICAR 2021 Opening Session

20:00 - 22:30

ICAR 2021 Welcome Reception

13:30 - 16:00 | Pre-Conference advanced course

Focus on molecular surveillance of epidemic/pandemic viral infections

13:30 - 16:00 | Pre-Conference advanced course

New opportunities in HIV and prevention: towards achieving controlled risk

13:30 - 16:00 | Pre-Conference advanced course

Long-acting therapies in HIV and bacterial infections: the nurse role

  • Auditorium Concordia
    13:30 - 16:00

    Special Session

    Incontro Scuole RaccontART

    Special Session

    Incontro Scuole RaccontART

    VII Edizione del concorso RaccontART, il contest artistico promosso tra gli studenti delle scuole superiori. Gli Istituti scolastici in gara: I.I.S. Ettore Majorana, San Lazzaro di Savena (BO) - I.S. Puecher-Olivetti, Rho (MI) - Liceo Artistico Giuseppe Terragni - Centro Studi Casnati, Como - Liceo Artistico Simone Weil, Treviglio (BG) - Liceo Linguistico Giovanni Pascoli, Firenze

    Chairs: A. Caraglia, F. Ceccherini - Silberstein, A. Lazzarin

    13.30 - 13.40 Benvenuto dei Presidenti ICAR 2021: G. V. Calvino, M. R. Capobianchi, A. M. Cattelan, C. Mussini
    13.40 - 14.10 Introduzione e presentazione della Giuria Artistica e Tecnico-Scientifica
    14.10 - 15.45 Presentazione delle Opere finaliste al Concorso a cura degli Istituti Scolastici
    15.45 - 16.00 Conclusioni
    16:30 - 17:15

    Satellite Symposium

    Reflecting on treatment strategies to achieve long-term treatment success in HIV

    Con la sponsorizzazione non condizionante di:

    Satellite Symposium

    Reflecting on treatment strategies to achieve long-term treatment success in HIV

    To explore how current treatment strategies, an evolving ART landscape and renewed focus on evolving patient needs will drive changes in treatment goals and expectations among PLWH. The meeting will open with a short plenary presentation reviewing how current treatment strategies are able to meet goals and patient needs in the management of both treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced PLWH, with focus on late-presenters, rapid ART initiation and switching strategies for optimizing ART to achieve treatment success. This will be followed by an eye to the future with the innovative HIV pipeline. Finally, a panel-led discussion will facilitate the discussion around the benefits and potential drawbacks of individualized approaches to reach long-term treatment success.

    Chairs: A.M. Cattelan, C. Mussini

    Discussant: A. Gori

    16.30 - 16.35 Introduction
    A.M. Cattelan, C. Mussini
    16.35 - 16.45 Current treatment strategies to meet evolving needs in HIV naïve patients
    A. d'Arminio Monforte
    16.45 - 16.55 Current treatment strategies and long term safety in HIV switching patients
    G. Di Perri
    16.55 - 17.05 How Long acting and future drugs will address individual patient needs
    A. Castagna
    17.05 - 17.15 Round table with faculty panel. Reflecting upon today for change tomorrow: addressing issues to improve outcomes across the diverse patient populations
    A. Gori
    17:20 - 20:00

    ICAR 2021 Opening Session

    ICAR 2021 Opening Session

    Chairs: A. Antinori, G.V. Calvino, M.R. Capobianchi, A. Caraglia, A.M. Cattelan, F. Ceccherini - Silberstein, M.L. Cosmaro, A. Cossarizza, M. Galli, A. Lazzarin, C. Mussini

    17.20 - 17.40 Introducing ICAR 2021: authorities' welcome addresses
    17.40 - 18.00 RaccontART contest Awards
    18.00 - 18.40 Lecture "40 years of HIV pandemic, 40 years of progress in medicine"
    G. Ippolito, M. Oldrini
    18.40 - 19.10 Mauro Moroni Memorial Lecture "40 years of AIDS: sorrows and successful stories"
    A. d'Arminio Monforte
    19.10 - 19.40 Lecture "The challenging field of vaccine research"
    R. Rappuoli
    19.40 - 20.00 Closing remarks
    20:00 - 22:30

    ICAR 2021 Welcome Reception

    ICAR 2021 Welcome Reception

  • Polissena A Hall
    13:30 - 16:00

    Pre-Conference advanced course

    Focus on molecular surveillance of epidemic/pandemic viral infections

    Pre-Conference advanced course

    Focus on molecular surveillance of epidemic/pandemic viral infections

    Genetic characterisation of viral genomes responsible for epidemic/pandemic episodes has been proven to be a powerful tool to understand outbreak transmission dynamics, spill-over events and to screen the mutations that potentially have an impact on transmissibility, pathogenicity and diagnostics. Sequence data can afford to monitor viral evolution and to timely identify potential markers of increased transmissibility, severity of disease or altered antigenicity. In addition, as the epidemic/pandemic evolves, these data become increasingly important in order to verify the match of the circulating variants with the response to vaccines and the possible emergence of antiviral resistance. By combining information of virus characteristics with clinical and epidemiological data, it is possible to plain public health interventions and to make outbreak control decisions.

    Chairs: I. Abbate, I. Bon, C. Tincati

    13.30 - 14.00 Epidemic/pandemic viral infections: origin, spread and adaptation of new human viruses
    G. Rossini
    14.00 - 14.30 Tracing the infection transmission chains
    F. Vairo
    14.30 - 15.00 Spatio-temporal distribution of SARS-CoV-2 during COVID-19 pandemic
    M. Chiara
    15.00 - 15.30 SARS-CoV-2 variants and immune evasion
    C. Tincati
    15.30 - 16.00 Discussion on Course issues
  • Polissena B Hall
    13:30 - 16:00

    Pre-Conference advanced course

    New opportunities in HIV and prevention: towards achieving controlled risk

    Pre-Conference advanced course

    New opportunities in HIV and prevention: towards achieving controlled risk

    The first form of treatment for HIV is prevention. The concept of prevention includes the broader concept of an individual's sexual health. Science is making advances toward the goal of preventing HIV and therefore most sexually transmitted infections. The rationale for this course is to investigate the concept of sexual health particularly in " neglected" populations with limited access to health care systems, such as the migrant population. Secondly, scientific advances in HIV prevention will be analyzed with a focus on new strategies for pre-exposure prophylaxis and ongoing trials for an HIV vaccine. Vaccine trials have posed a new key concept, represented by the management of the in-trial patient, the sexually transmitted diseases that occur during the trial and the management of VISP (vaccine-induced seropositivity). Another extremely important way of prevention is the HIV-patient on treatment, and it is crucial in this setting to hear the voice of HIV-positive patients on treatment and with undetectable viral load.

    Chairs: L. Badia, A. Bignardi, G. Cuomo, R. Rossotti

    13.30 - 14.00 High risk sexual behaviors and HIV/STDs cascade of care in migrants
    V. Fiore
    14.00 - 14.30 New PrEP strategies beyond F/TDF
    E. Bruzzesi
    14.30 - 15.00 In-treatment patient's experience
    N. Frattini, M. Stizioli
    15.00 - 15.30 Clinical management in ongoing HIV vaccine trials: key points and challenges
    M. Menozzi
    15.30 - 16.00 Discussion on Course issues
  • Room 3
    13:30 - 16:00

    Pre-Conference advanced course

    Long-acting therapies in HIV and bacterial infections: the nurse role

    Pre-Conference advanced course

    Long-acting therapies in HIV and bacterial infections: the nurse role

    The introducing of long-acting therapy in the clinical practice of Infectious Disease Units will bring positive implications in the management of chronic patients with HIV and bacterial infections. It will be required to reshape the organization of the clinics and consequently a new nursing care model have to be redefined. After forty years of fighting against HIV, the principal aim is the development of antiretroviral therapies capable to reduce the disease progression and slow down clinical manifestations. The use of long-acting therapy can leading to an improvement in therapeutic adherence. This is fundamental in daily clinical practice, especially for the nursing figure who is personally involved not only in the administration of the drug but also in patient's information and education. Moreover, the use of long-acting therapy in bacterial infections, patients could be treated in outpatient regimens or at home with an improvement in therapeutic efficacy and in the reduction of hospitalizations and healthcare costs.

    Chair: M. Gatti

    13.30 - 14.00 HIV long-acting therapy: new nursing care model
    E.M. Beretta
    14.00 - 14.30 Long active drugs are an opportunity to improve adherence to care
    S. Aliverti
    14.30 - 15.00 Nursing management of Gram-positive infections
    M. Luciano
    15.00 - 15.30 Outpatient parenteral antibiotic treatment: the nurse role
    M. Cornia
    15.30 - 16.00 Discussion on Course issues
 
Auditorium Concordia
Polissena A Hall
Polissena B Hall
Room 3
09:00
09:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
13:00
13:30
14:00
14:30
15:00
15:30
16:00
16:30
17:00
17:30
18:00
18:30
19:00

09:00 - 10:00

Keynote Lectures

10:05 - 11:05 | Symposium

Antiviral immune control

11:10 - 12:10 | Sponsored Symposium

2DR: Evolving mindset, expanding experience

12:15 - 13:15 | Symposium

Pharmacology of antiviral drugs and vaccines

13.15 - 14.15 | Oral Poster

Foyer Auditorium - Oral Poster

14:15 - 15:15 | Sponsored Symposium

Continuous innovation for long-term treatment success

15:20 - 16:20 | Symposium

Behavioral and social impact of COVID-19 in PLWH

16:25 - 17:25 | Symposium

SARS-CoV-2 infection in persons living with HIV

17:30 - 18:30 | Symposium

Novel long-acting therapies for the treatment of Multidrug-Resistant (MDR) HIV-1 infection: let's go undetectable again

10:05 - 11:05 | Oral Communications

Clinical HIV

11:10 - 12:10 | Oral Communications

Coinfections and Hepatitis

12:15 - 13:15 | Oral Communications

Clinical HIV & Clinical COVID I

14:15 - 15:15 | Oral Communications

Epidemiology/Social sciences II

15:20 - 16:20 | Expert Meeting

Monoclonal antibodies and their role in COVID-19 patients: results and perspectives

16:25 - 17:25 | Expert Meeting

Vaccines roadmap: the humanity game-changer

17:30 - 18:30 | Symposium

Co-infections in 2021

10:05 - 11:05 | Oral Communications

Epidemiology/Social sciences I

11:10 - 12:10 | Expert Meeting

MDR pathogens in the COVID-19 era: experiences with Cefiderocol

12:15 - 13:15 | Expert Meeting

The first of a new generation NNRTI: the opportunity to get to the heart of PLWH

14:15 - 15:15 | Expert Meeting

Hyperinflammation and COVID-19: from research to clinical practice

15:20 - 16:20 | Expert Meeting

Roundtable New treatment options for heavily pretreated patients

16:25 - 17:25 | Oral Communications

Antiretroviral Therapy I

17:30 - 18:30 | Oral Communications

Clinical HIV & Clinical COVID II

11:10 - 13:00 | Meet the Community

40 years of HIV: reforming law 135/90 to achieve 2030 SDG and AIDS elimination

13:15 - 14:15 | Expert Meeting

ICONA-PROs in the real-life setting

16:25 - 17:25 | Oral Communications

Epidemiology/Social sciences III

  • Auditorium Concordia
    09:00 - 10:00

    Keynote Lectures

    Keynote Lectures

    Chairs: A. De Maria, A. Moznich

    09.00 - 09.30 Community services for vulnerable groups at the forefront during the COVID-19 pandemic. How to ensure sustainability?
    D. Calzavara
    09.30 - 10.00 Immune System biology to fight COVID-19
    S. De Biasi
    10:05 - 11:05

    Symposium

    Antiviral immune control

    Symposium

    Antiviral immune control

    The delicate balance between protective and pathogenetic processes during viral infections represents a key topic to be addresses in order to identify protective signature and viral/host targets for new treatments. In SARS-CoV-2 infection, the wide range of clinical presentations of COVID-19, ranging from asymptomatic to severe pneumonia, strongly supports a main role of host factors in defining the outcome of the infection. Accordingly, several studies described underlying immune-based pathogenic mechanisms characterized by a profound lymphopenia, an exacerbated inflammatory responses and a dysregulated innate and adaptive immune response. Early events after infection (Type-I IFN-s, innate immune cells activation, inflammatory storm) can represent the first critical step able to drive the generation of a sterilizing and long lasting immunity.

    Chair: L. Lopalco

    10.05 - 10.10 Introduction
    10.10 - 10.20 Maintening immunological memory in COVID-19 patients: the role of vaccination
    A. Mazzoni
    10.20 - 10.30 Interferon pathways in controlling HIV and COVID infections
    C. Scagnolari
    10.30 - 10.40 Exploring humoral immunity in COVID patients
    G. Siracusano
    10.40 - 10.50 Persistence of an intact HIV reservoir in CD4 T cell subtypes
    E. Venanzi Rullo
    10.50 - 11.05 Discussion on Symposium issues
    11:10 - 12:10

    Sponsored Symposium

    2DR: Evolving mindset, expanding experience

    Con il supporto di:

    Sponsored Symposium

    2DR: Evolving mindset, expanding experience

    The life expectancy of people living with HIV (PLWHIV) is now close to the one of HIV negative people. This important milestone has been achieved thanks to the continuous evolution of antiretroviral therapy (ART), the basis of which continuous improvement placed on providing optimal therapeutic options for long-term management. In this context, ART therapy has evolved in the direction of 2-drug regimens (2DR), which, initially considered a new concept, today represent a reality in the embedded phase. In particular, dolutegravir (DTG) -based regimens are an important therapeutic option, both in the initial phase of treatment and in the switch from ARV. Starting from these assumptions, the session will focus on the evolution of the mindset in therapy management thanks to the solid evidence from the clinical studies available for DTG / 3TC and DTG / RPV. This evolution is associated with a growth of experience in clinical practice with the expansion of the use of DTG-based 2DRs in both HIV + naive and virologically suppressed patients. Regarding these aspects, the most recent data available for regimens containing dolutegravir and lamivudine (DTG / 3TC; DTG + 3TC) and dolutegravir and rilpivirine (DTG / RPV) will be investigated.

    Moderatori: A. Di Biagio, S. Lo Caputo

    11.10 - 11.15 Introduction
    A. Di Biagio, S. Lo Caputo
    11.15 - 11.35 Evolving mindset with 2DR: the latest results to better identify the right patient at the right time
    D. Ripamonti
    11.35 - 11.55 Expanding experience with 2DR: the latest learnings from the real-life use of DTG/3TC in HIV+ naïve and switch patients
    S. Di Giambenedetto
    11.55 - 12.10 Discussion on Symposium issues
    12:15 - 13:15

    Symposium

    Pharmacology of antiviral drugs and vaccines

    Symposium

    Pharmacology of antiviral drugs and vaccines

    At global level, the change in viral dynamics is severe enough to require a corresponding interest in discussing some of the issues directly related to the pandemic controls, i.e. the variability of the viruses and the  microbiological aspects of vaccination. As far as the "pharmacology" issue is concerned, it is interesting noting that several antiretroviral drugs are substrates of enzymes belonging to the cytochrome P450 superfamily, which are polymorphically expressed, and consistent evidences are available in literature showing that genetic variation in these enzymes can predict the likelihood of anti-HIV treatment success, toxicity and/or the potential for drug-drug interactions. Preliminary evidences are also available showing that allelic variants of genes involved in the pharmacodynamics of antiretroviral drugs can impact on the clinical outcome of people living with HIV. 

    Chairs: G. Scarlatti, M. Zazzi

    12.15 - 12.30 Pharmacogenetics of drug response in antiviral therapies
    J. Cusato
    12.30 - 12.45 Variability and evolution of viruses: biological and clinical aspects
    C.F. Perno
    12.45 - 13.00 Vaccines against viruses: the microbiological point of view
    I. Cassaniti
    13.00 - 13.15 The influence of inflammation on antiviral drugs disposition and efficacy
    G.C. Marchetti
    13:15 - 14:15

    13.15 - 14.15 | Oral Poster

    Foyer Auditorium - Oral Poster

    Oral Poster

    Antiretroviral Therapy I

    Chairs: F. Bai, V. Colangeli

    13.15 - 13.20

    OP 1

    Real-life Experience with Dolutegravir-Based Two-Drug Regimens
    R. Pincino1, A. Falletta1, S. Blanchi1, S. Mora3, M. Giacomini3, L. Taramasso2, M. Bassetti1,2, A. Di Biagio1,2
    1Infectious Diseases Clinic, University of Genoa, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, San Martino Hospital, Genoa, 3Department of Informatics, Bioengineering, Robotics and System Engineering, University of Genoa

    13.22 - 13.27

    OP 2

    Comparison of efficacy and tolerability of Dolutegravir / Rilpivirine or Dolutegravir / Lamivudine in experienced HIV-1 positive patients switched from a three-drug regimen based on Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors in a single center in Italy
    F. Lagi1,2, M. Romanelli1, S. Tekle Kiros1, F. Ducci1, A. Bartoloni1,2, G. Sterrantino1
    1Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Florence Italy, 2Infectious and Tropical Diseases Unit, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy

    13.29 - 13.34

    OP 3

    Efficacy and safety of switching from efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (EFV/FTC/TDF) to bictegravir/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide (BIC/FTC/TAF) in virologically-suppressed HIV patients (EBONY Study)
    S. Cicalini, P. Lorenzini, E. Grilli, S. Ottou, M.M. Plazzi, F. De Zottis, M. Camici, M. Fusto, R. Gagliardini, R. Bellagamba, A. Antinori
    National Institute for Infectious Diseases "Lazzaro Spallanzani", IRCCS, Rome

    13.36 - 13.41

    OP 4

    Efficacy and tolerability of a switch to bictegravir/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide in virally suppressed PLWH
    D. Canetti1, A. Poli1, L. Galli1, S. Nozza1, V. Spagnuolo1,2, C. Muccini1,2, M. Mastrangelo2, E. Bruzzesi2, M. Ranzenigo2, M. Chiurlo2, A. Castagna1,2, N. Gianotti1
    1Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 2Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy

    13.43 - 13.48

    OP 5

    Efficacy, safety and feasibility of a rapid antiretroviral therapy starting B/F/TAF in advanced hiv disease (Rainbow study)
    M. Camici, R. Gagliardini, P. Lorenzini, S. Ottou, A. Mondi, M.M. Plazzi, C. Pinnetti, A. Vergori, E. Grilli, F. De Zottis, I. Mastrorosa, V. Mazzotta, J. Paulicelli, R. Bellagamba, S. Cicalini, A. Antinori
    National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Rome

    13.50 - 13.55

    OP 6

    Effectiveness, safety and tolerability of bictegravir/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide (B/F/TAF) in people living with HIV (PLWH) in routine clinical practice: 6-month results of the Italian BICSTaR cohort
    A. d’Arminio Monforte1, S. Rusconi2, D. Canetti3, G. Di Perri4, E. Quiros-Roldan5, A. Giacometti6, A. Antinori7, M. Andreoni8, A. Saracino9, L. Albini10, R. Caldera10, G. Forcina10, V. Esposito11
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, "ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo”, Milan, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Unit, ASST is Ovest Milanese - University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 3Clinic of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 4Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases, University of Turin, Italy, 5Division of Infectious and Tropical Medicine, ASST Spedali Civili, Brescia Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Clinic, Department of Biological Sciences and Public Health, Marche Polytechnic University, Ancona, Italy, 7HIV/AIDS Department, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, L. Spallanzani, IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 8Infectious Diseases Clinic, University Hospital "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy, 9Division of Infectious Diseases, Bari University Hospital, University of Bari, Italy, 10Gilead Sciences Srl, Milan, Italy, 11Infectious Diseases and Gender Medicine Unit D. Cotugno Hospital-A.O. dei Colli Naples, Italy

    Oral Poster

    Comorbidities/Miscellaneous

    Chairs: L. Calza, F. Carli

    13.15 - 13.20

    OP 7

    MARAND-X: clinical trial on the use of less neurotoxic antiretrovirals in HAND
    A. Lazzaro1, A. Barco2, G. Stroffolini2, V. Pirriatore2, D Vai3, G. Guastamacchia3, C. Giacone3, M. Nigra4, G. Noce5, V. Ghisetti6, M.C. Tettoni2, M. Trunfio2, A. Trentalange2, S. Bonora2, G. Di Perri2, A. Calcagno2
    1Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Policlinico Umberto I of Rome, Rome, Italy, 2Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy, 3Unit of Neurology, Maria Vittoria Hospital, ASL “Città di Torino”, Turin, Italy, 4Biochemistry and Immunology Laboratory, Maria Vittoria Hospital, ASL “Città di Torino”, Turin, Italy, 5IRCCS SDN, Napoli, Italy, 6Microbiology and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, ASL “Città di Torino”, Turin, Italy

    13.22 - 13.27

    OP 8

    Management of diabetes mellitus in people living with HIV and diabetes: a single-center experience
    D. Cattaneo, C. Resnati, A. Gidaro, A. Rossi, A. Merlo, T. Formenti, P. Meraviglia, S. Antinori, C. Gervasoni
    ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco University Hospital, Milano, Italy

    13.29 - 13.34

    OP 9

    The interplay between resilience and health related quality of Life in PLWH during the COVID era: a comparison of a geriatric cohort with a cohort of PLWH younger than 65 years
    G. Guaraldi1, J. Milic1, M. Ferrara2, L. Micai2, S. Barbieri1, E. Aprile1, M. Belli1, M. Venuta1, S. Arsuffi3, C. Fornari3, E. Focà3, G. Di Perri2, S. Bonora2, S. Calza4, C. Mussini1, A. Calcagno2
    1University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Torino, 3Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia, 4Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Italy, Brescia, Italy

    13.36 - 13.41

    OP 10

    Efficacy and Tolerability of Doravirine + Raltegravir combination regimen as therapy of switch in ART experienced PLWHIV: the DOR-INI experience
    M. Poliseno1, S.R. Bruno1, S. Ferrara1, C. Gallo2, L. Montemurro1, M.L. D’ Errico1, M. Rizzo1, T.A. Santantonio1, S. Lo Caputo1
    1Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Unit of Infectious Diseases, Policlinico "Riuniti", Foggia, Italy, 2Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy

    13.43 - 13.48

    OP 11

    Trends of polypharmacy and 2DR antiretroviral use: a 15-year observational matched-cohort study
    J. Milic1,2, S. Cantergiani3, S. Barbieri1, F. Carli2,4, G. Cuomo2,4, D. Yaacoub4, G. Burastero4, M. Faltoni4, G. Franceschi4, S. Volpi4, V. Iadisernia4, C. Mussini1,4, G. Guaraldi1,2,4
    1Department of Surgical, Medical, Dental and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy, 2Modena HIV Metabolic Clinic (MHMC), University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy, 3University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 4Department of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Policlinico of Modena, Modena, Italy

    13.50 - 13.55

    OP 12

    Rapid, drug-resistance-driven, start of antiretroviral therapy: an open-label, prospective, proof-of-concept, clinical study (TWODAY Study)
    N. Gianotti1, L. Galli1, L. Della Torre1, G. Annicchiarico1, S. Aliverti1, S. Nozza1, F. Badalucco1,2, G. Mori1,2, I. Mainardi1,2, R. Monardo1,2, G. Ponta1,2, A. Castagna1,2
    1San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Infectious Diseases, Milano, Italy, 2Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Milano, Italy

    Oral Poster

    HIV & COVID I

    Chair: P. Maggi

    13.15 - 13.20

    OP 13

    UV irradiation and SARS‐CoV‐2: a focus on UVA/UVB/UVC -inactivation on viral replication
    S. STRIZZI1,2, A. Introini1, A. BIANCO3, O. Utyro1, S. Musollino1, D. Trabattoni1, G. Pareschi3, M. BIASIN1, M. Clerici1
    1DIBIC University of Milan, 2University of Sassari, 3INAF- Brera Astronomical Observatory Merate

    13.22 - 13.27

    OP 14

    Determinants and characteristics of progressor and non progressor SARS COV-2 infected patients
    P. Zuccalà, E. Chichi, R. Marocco, B. Kertusha, T. Tieghi, L. Fondaco, M. Del Borgo, A. Gasperin, A. Parente, D. Caianiello, A. Cifra, G. Gabrielli, G. Brignone, A. Spagnolo, M. Lichtner
    Hospital "S.Maria Goretti", UOC Infectious Diseases, Latina and "Sapienza" University of Rome, Polo Pontino

    13.29 - 13.34

    OP 15

    Metabolic associated fatty liver disease is highly prevalent in the post-acute COVID syndrome
    J. Milic1, S. Barbieri1, L. Gozzi1, A. Brigo2, B. Beghé3, A. Verduri3, E. Bacca4, V. Iadisernia4, G. Cuomo4, G. Dolci4, D. Yaacoub4, E. Aprile4, M. Belli4, M. Venuta4, M. Meschiari4, G. Sebastiani6,7, E. Clini3, C. Mussini1,3, A. Lonardo5, P. Raggi*8, G. Guaraldi1,4
    1Department of Surgical, Medical, Dental and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy, 2University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 3Respiratory Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Policlinico of Modena, Modena, Italy, 4Department of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Policlinico of Modena, Modena, Italy, 5Department of Internal Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Ospedale Civile di Baggiovara, Modena, Italy, 6Division of Experimental Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada, 7Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada, 8Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

    13.36 - 13.41

    OP 16

    Assessment of well-being, resilience and intrinsic capacity in patients with post-acute COVID-19 syndrome
    J. Milic1, T. Marchiò2, S. Barbieri1, F. Medioli3, J. Conti3, S. Esperti3, A. Mazzocchi3, M. Del Monte3, I. Baldisserotto3, M.D. Di Trapani3, A. Dessilani3, C. Mussini1,3, G. Guaraldi1,3
    1Department of Surgical, Medical, Dental and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy, 2University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 3Department of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Policlinico of Modena, Modena, Italy

    13.43 - 13.48

    OP 17

    Achieving virological control in pan-resistant HIV-1 infection
    D. Canetti1, C. Muccini1,2, V. Spagnuolo2, L. Galli1, A. Poli1, N. Gianotti1, M. Feasi3, A. Castagna1,2
    1Department of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 2Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 3Ente Ospedaliero Ospedali Galliera, Genoa, Italy

    13.50 - 13.55

    OP 18

    Resilience and frailty in people living with HIV during the COVID era: two complementary constructs associated with health-related quality of life
    G. Guaraldi1,2,3, J. Milic1,2, S. Barbieri1, T. Marchiò4, A. Caselgrandi4, E. Aprile3, M. Belli3, M. Venuta3, C. Mussini1,3
    1Department of Surgical, Medical, Dental and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy, 2Modena HIV Metabolic Clinic (MHMC), University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy, 3Department of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Policlinico of Modena, Modena, Italy, 4University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy

    Oral Poster

    Coinfections and Hepatitis

    Chairs: P. Colletti, I. Maida, G. Mazzola

    13.15 - 13.20

    OP 19

    Impact of polypharmacy and aging on the risk of multiple drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in HCV patients treated with pangenotypic direct-acting antivirals (pDAA)
    A. Mangia1, P. Toniutto2, N. Coppola3, D.D. Ancona4, M. Andretta5, F. Bartolini6, F. Ferrante7, A. Lupi8, S. Palcic9, F.V. Rizzi10, D. Re11, G.A. Nieto12, C. Hernandez12, V. Perrone13, L. Degli Esposti13, S. Fagiuoli14
    1Irccs- Ospedale Casa Sollievo Della Sofferenza, 2Hepatology and Liver Transplantation Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria, Udine, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, University of Campania L. Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy, 4Direttore Del Dipartimento Farmaceutico Della ASL BAT, 5Uoc Assistenza Farmaceutica Territoriale, Azienda
    Ulss 8 Berica,
    6Direttore Dipartimento Farmaceutico-Usl Umbria 2, 7Direttore Dipartimento Della diagnostica Ed Assistenza Farmaceutica – ASL Frosinone, Frosinone, Italia, 8Direttore Di Struttura complessa Di Cardiologia – ASL Vco - Omegna (VB), 9Dirigente Della Farmaceutica Territoriale- Azienda Sanitaria Universitaria Integrata Giuliano-Isontina (ASUGI), 10Dirigente Responsabile Uos Farmacovigilanza e Monitoraggio Spesa Farmaceutica- ASL BAT, 11Servizio Farmaceutico Territoriale ASL Teramo, 12Gilead Sciences, 13Clicon S.r.l., Health Economics and Outcomes Research, 14Gastroenterology and Transplant Hepatology, Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Bergamo, Italy

    13.22 - 13.27

    OP 20

    HBeAg levels vary across the different phases of HBV infection, and can be predictive of therapeutic outcome in the setting of immunosuppression-driven HBV reactivation
    L. Piermatteo1, M. Alkhatib1, A. Bertoli1, D. Stella1, E. Basile2, A. Iuvara2, M. De Cristofaro3, G. Cappiello3, C. Cerva4, V. Malagnino4, C. Minichini5, M. Pisaturo5, M. Starace5, N. Coppola5, C. Fontana2, M. Angelico6, M. Andreoni4, L. Sarmati4, S. Grelli1,2, F. Ceccherini Silberstein1, V. Svicher1, R. Salpini1
    1University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Department of Experimental Medicine, Rome, Italy, 2University Hospital of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Microbiology and Virology Unit, Rome, Italy, 3“Sandro Pertini” Hospital, Microbiology Unit, Rome, Italy, 4University Hospital of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Infectious Disease Unit, Rome, Italy, 5University of Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Department of Medical, Surgical, Neurological, Metabolic and Aging Sciences, Naples, Italy, 6University Hospital of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Hepatology Unit, Rome, Italy

    13.29 - 13.34

    OP 21

    HCV knowledge and awarness among injecting drug users in the direct acting antivirals era
    A. Boschini1, P. Piselli2, C. Smacchia3, R. Poletti1, M. Begnini1, P. Ottogalli1, C. Cimaglia2, M.P. Parracino2, E. Girardi2
    1Comunità San Patrignano, Rimini, 2INMI “L. Spallanzani” IRCCS, Rome, 3Servizio Dipendenza Patologiche Verona

    13.36 - 13.41

    OP 22

    A pilot intervention for HCV elimination among MSM in Rome: an update on more than 1200 screened individuals
    P. Piselli1, M. Giuliani2, M. Farinella3, C. Cimaglia1, A. Latini2, F. Carduccelli3, C. Ancona2, O. Bruzzi1, G. De Carli1, R. Esvan1, F. Gili1, M. Marra3, N. Orchi1, E. Piscitelli1, S. Pittalis1, A.R. Garbuglia1, A. Amendola1, S. Meschi1, S. Cicalini1, M. De Palo1, M. Zaccarelli1, E. Grilli1, G. Scarfò1, A. Puleio1, A. Antinori1, M.R. Capobianchi1, A. Cristaudo2, G. D’Offizi1, V. Puro1, E. Girardi1
    1INMI “L. Spallanzani” IRCCS, Rome, 2STI/HIV Unit, San Gallicano Dermatological Institute, IRCCS, Rome, 3Circolo di Cultura Omosessuale “Mario Mieli”, Rome, Italy

    13.43 - 13.48

    OP 23

    Humoral response to mRNA SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in cirrhotic patients without prior exposure to the virus
    C. Sorace, E. Biliotti, U. Visco, R. Lionetti, M. Montalbano, M. Depalo, A. Rianda, C. Taibi, C. Castilletti, P. Gallì, G. D’Offizi
    INMI L.Spallanzani, Roma, Italia

    13.50 - 13.55

    OP 24

    Syphilis reinfection in people living with HIV (PLWH): a monocentric retrospective study
    G. Tiecco1, V. Marchese2, S. Storti1, M. Degli Antoni1, S. Amadasi2, M. Gulletta2, S. Calza3, F. Viola1, E. Focà1, F. Castelli1, E. Quiros-Roldan1
    1Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali di Brescia, Italy, 2Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali di Brescia, Italy, 3Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Italy

    Oral Poster

    Immunopathogenesis I

    Chair: G. Liuzzi

    13.15 - 13.20

    OP 25

    Decreased neutralization of the B.1.525 (Nigerian) SARS-CoV-2 variant by sera of previously infected and uninfected vaccinated individuals
    I. Vicenti1, F. Dragoni1, A. Boccuto1, A. Bergna2, C. Della Ventura2, F. Giammarino1, F. Saladini1, L. Pezzati3, G. Zehender2, M. Zazzi1, A. Lai2
    1Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 2Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences L. Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 3Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milan, Italy

    13.22 - 13.27

    OP 26

    Severity of COVID-19 patients predicted by serum sphingolipids signature
    E. Torretta1, M. Garziano2,3, M. Poliseno4, D. Capitanio5, M. Biasin3, T.A. Santantonio4, M. Clerici2,6, S. Lo Caputo4, D. Trabattoni3, C. Gelfi1,5
    1IRCCS Orthopedic Institute Galeazzi, Milan, Italy, 2Department of of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Milan, Italy, 3Departiment of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences “L. Sacco”, Milan, Italy, 4Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 5Department of Biomedical Sciences for Health, University of Milan, Segrate, Italy, 6Don C. Gnocchi Foundation, IRCCS, Milano, Italy

    13.29 - 13.34

    OP 27

    Expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells contribute to platelet activation by L-Arginine deprivation during SARS-CoV-2 infection
    A. Sacchi, G. Grassi, S. Notari, S. Gili, V. Bordoni, E. Tartaglia, R. Casetti, E. Cimini, D. Mariotti, G. Garotto, A. Beccacece, L. Marchioni, M. Bibas, E. Nicastri, G. Ippolito, C. Agrati
    National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani-IRCCS, Rome, Italy

    13.36 - 13.41

    OP 28

    Cysteamine is an approved drug with antiviral and immunomodulatory properties promising for COVID-19 treatment
    T. Alonzi1, A. Aiello1, L. Petrone1, S. Najafi Fard1, M. D’Eletto2, L. Falasca1, R. Nardacci1, F. Rossin2, G. Delogu3,4, C. Castilletti1, M.R. Capobianchi1, G. Ippolito1, M. Piacentini1,2, D. Goletti1
    1Istituto Nazionale per le Malattie Infettive “L. Spallanzani” IRCCS, 2Department of Biology, University of Rome "Tor Vergata, 3Institute of Microbiology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Fondazione Policlinico Gemelli, 4Mater Olbia Hospital

    13.43 - 13.48

    OP 29

    High CD169 monocyte/lymphocyte ratio reflects the immuno-phenotyping disruption and predicts oxygen need in COVID-19 patients
    M. FANELLI1, V. PETRONE1, A. MINUTOLO1, C. MARACCHIONI1, M. IANNETTA2,3, M. GIUDICE1, I.A. BELKACEM4,5, M. ZORDAN2,3, P. VITALE3, P. SINIBALDI VALLEBONA1,6, L. SARMATI2,3, M. ANDREONI2,3, F. MALERGUE5, G. RASI1, P. DI FRANCESCO1, E. BALESTRIERI1, C. MATTEUCCI1, S. GRELLI1,7
    1Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 2Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases Clinic, Policlinic of Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 4Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, INSERM, CIML, Centre d'Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy, Marseille, France, 5Department of Research and Development, Beckman Coulter Life Sciences-Immunotech, Marseille, France, 6Institute of Translational Pharmacology, National Research Council, Rome, Italy, 7Virology Unit, Policlinic of Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy

    13.50 - 13.55

    OP 30

    Effect of SARS-CoV-2 sequences on immune response in A549-ACE2 lung cells
    G. CAPPELLETTI1, S. STRIZZI1, M. SARESELLA3, S. MUSOLLINO1, C. FENIZIA1,2, D. TRABATTONI1, M. CLERICI2,3, R. CAGLIANI4, D. FORNI4, M. SIRONI4, M. BIASIN1
    1Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche e Cliniche “L. Sacco”, Milan, Italy, 2Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Medico-Chirurgica e dei Trapianti, Milan, Italy, 3IRCCS Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi, Milan, Italy, 4IRCCS Eugenio Medea,Milan, Italy

    Oral Poster

    Epidemiology/Social Sciences I

    Chair: A. Bianchi

    13.15 - 13.20

    OP 31

    SARS-CoV-2 evolutionary dynamics in the first phase of the epidemic in Italy
    A. Lai1, A. Bergna1, S. Toppo2,3, M. Morganti4, S. Menzo5, V. Ghisetti6, B. Bruzzone7, M. Codeluppi8, V. Fiore9, E. Venanzi Rullo10, G. Antonelli11, L. Sarmati12, G. Brindicci13, A. Callegaro14, C. Sagnelli15, D. Francisci16, I. Vicenti17, A. Miola18, G. Tonon19,20, D. Cirillo21, I. Menozzi4, S. Caucci5, F. Cerutti6, A. Orsi22, R. Schiavo23, S. Babudieri9, G. Nunnari10, C.M. Mastroianni24, M. Andreoni12, L. Monno13, D. Guarneri14, N. Coppola15, A. Crisanti25,26, M. Galli1, G. Zehender1 and SCIRE- SARS-CoV-2 Italian Research Enterprise- collaborative group^
    1Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences Luigi Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 2Department of Molecular Medicine University of Padova, Padua, Italy, 3CRIBI Biotech Center University of Padova, Padua, Italy, 4Risk Analyses and Genomic Epidemiology Unit, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Lombardia e dell’Emilia Romagna, Parma, Italy, 5Department of Biomedical Sciences and Public Health, Virology Unit, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy, 6Laboratory of Microbiology and Virology, Amedeo di Savoia, ASL Città di Torino, Torino, Italy, 7Hygiene Unit, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Genoa, Italy, 8UOC of Infectious Diseases, Department of Oncology and Hematology, Guglielmo da Saliceto Hospital, AUSL Piacenza, Italy, 9Infectious and Tropical Disease Clinic, Department of Medical, Surgical and Experimental Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 10Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Messina, Messina, Italy, 11Department of Molecular Medicine, University Hospital Policlinico Umberto I, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 12Infectious Diseases, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy, 13Infectious Diseases Unit, University of Bari, Bari, Italy, 14Microbiology and Virology Laboratory, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 15Department of Mental Health and Public Medicine, University of Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Naples, Italy, 16Department of Medicine and Surgery, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, "Santa Maria della Misericordia" Hospital, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy, 17Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy, 18Intesa San Paolo Innovation Center-AI LAB, Turin, Italy, 19Center for Omics Sciences, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy, 20Division of Experimental Oncology, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy, 21Division of Immunology, Transplantation and Infectious Disease, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy, 22Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy, 23UOC of Microbiology, Department of Clinical Pathology, Guglielmo da Saliceto Hospital, AUSL Piacenza, Italy, 24Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, University Hospital Policlinico Umberto I, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 25Microbiology and Virology Diagnostic Unit Padua University Hospital, Padua, Italy, 26Department of Life Science Imperial College London South Kensington Campus Imperial College Road SW7 AZ London, United Kingdom, UK

    13.22 - 13.27

    OP 32

    Characterization of SARS-CoV-2 variants circulating in Central Italy by deep-sequencing of full-length S gene
    M.C. Bellocchi1, R. Scutari1, L. Carioti1, M. Iannetta2, L. Piermatteo1, M. Botticelli1, M. Alkhatib1, S. Tedde2, L. Duca1, V. Malagnino2, A. Crea2, L. Ansaldo2, E. Teti2, L. Coppola2, S. D’Anna1, A. Bertoli1, A. Di Lorenzo2, P. Paba2, P. Saccomandi1, R. Salpini1, V. Svicher1, L. Sarmati2, M. Andreoni2, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein1 for the PTV-ID-COVID Group
    1University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 2University Hospital of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy

    13.29 - 13.34

    OP 33

    Impact of COVID pandemic and anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunization on vaccination against sexually transmitted infections
    R. Rossotti1,2, C. Baiguera1, M.C. Moioli1, D. Calzavara2, C. Rogati1, P. Vinti2, L. Brunelli1, L. Rezzonico1, M. Cernuschi2,3, M. Puoti1
    1ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, 2Milano Checkpoint, Milan, 3IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan

    13.36 - 13.41

    OP 34

    Influenza vaccine: knowledge and beliefs among adherent PLWH during the first seasonal campaign of the COVID-19 era
    V. Marchese, S. Storti, G. Tiecco, M. Degli Antoni, F. Viola, C. Morganti, F. Castelli, E.Focà, E. Quiros-Roldan
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali di Brescia

    13.43 - 13.48

    OP 35

    Results of a SARS-CoV-2 worker screening in the Marche Nord companies to prevent virus infection in the workplace
    C. Orlandi1, D. Betti1, B. Borghi2, A. Baroni2, M. Papalini2, M. Magnani1, A. Casabianca1
    1Department of Biomolecular Sciences, University of Urbino "Carlo Bo”, 2Confindustria Pesaro Urbino

    13.50 - 13.55

    OP 36

    A mixed method of follow-up with total patient care provided continuum with saving of hospital checks during the COVID-19 pandemic
    P. Fusco1, M. Mazzitelli1,2, F. Serapide1,3, V. Scaglione1,3, R. Lionello1,3, C. Davoli1, M.T. Tassone1, V. La Gamba1, E.M. Trecarichi1,3, C. Costa3, C. Torti1,3
    1University “Magna Graecia”, Catanzaro, 2Unit of Infectious Diseases, “Azienda Ospedale Università Padova”, Padova, 3Unit of Infectious Diseases, “Mater Domini” Hospital, Catanzaro

    Oral Poster

    Epidemiology/Social Sciences II

    Chairs: M. Breveglieri, T.S. Prestileo

    13.15 - 13.20

    OP 37

    HIV-related internalized stigma and patient health engagement (PHE) model in an Italian cohort of people living with HIV
    V. Massaroni1, V. Delle Donne1, N. Ciccarelli2, F. Lombardi3, S. Lamonica3, A. Borghetti3, A. Ciccullo4, S. Di Giambenedetto1,3
    1Infectious Diseases Institute, Department of Safety and Bioethics, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy, 2Department of Psychology, Catholic University, Milan, Italy, 3UOC Infectious Diseases, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 4UOC Infectious Diseases, Ospedale S. Salvatore, L’Aquila, Italy

    13.22 - 13.27

    OP 38

    Talking about stigma and Hiv prevention, the artists' contribution
    G. Dessì, V. Mascia, B. Mocci
    Lila Cagliari OdV, Cagliari

    13.29 - 13.34

    OP 39

    A visual scale to evaluate the quality of life in PLWHA. Fourth-90, utopia or reality?
    F. Paciosi1, C. Pallotto2, A. Lanzi1,C. Papalini2, M.B. Pasticci3, D. Francisci1
    1Infectious Diseases Clinic, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Clinic, General Hospital of Perugia, Perugia, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases Clinic, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Perugia, Terni, Italy

    13.36 - 13.41

    OP 40

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) from HIV patients' perspective: comparison of patients-reported outcome (PRO) measures among people living with HIV (PLWH) and other chronic clinical conditions
    C. Seguiti1,2, P.F. Salvo1, E. Di Stasio3,4, S. La Monica2, A.L. Fedele5, S. Manfrida6, N. Ciccarelli7, B. Corvari6, C. De Luca3, L. Tartaglione8, D. Pitocco8, R. Cauda1,2, A. Cingolani1,2
    1Malattie Infettive, Università Cattolica S. Cuore, Roma, 2UOC Malattie Infettive, Fondazione Policlinico A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma, 3UOC Chimica, Biochimica e Biologia Molecolare Clinica, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, IRCCS, Roma, 4Dipartimento di Scienze biotecnologiche di base, cliniche intensivologiche e perioperatorie, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, 5Divisione Reumatologia, Fondazione Policlinico A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma, 6Dipartimento di Diagnostica per Immagini, Radioterapia Oncologica ed Ematologia, Fondazione Pol. A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma, 7Dipartimento di Psicologia, Università Cattolica, Milano, 8UOS Diabetologia, Fondazione Policlinico A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma

    13.43 - 13.48

    OP 41

    Using technology to support vulnerable PLWHIV at the time of coronavirus
    S. Patrucco1, P. Altini1, G.L. Cipero1, C. Di Chio1, S. Maneo1, G. Orofino2, A. Perziano1
    1ARCOBALENO Aids ODV Torino, 2Ospedale Amedeo di Savoia Torino - ARCOBALENO Aids ODV Torino

    13.50 - 13.55

    OP 42

    Impact of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic on quality of life in people with HIV
    M. Fois, A. De Vito, B. Zauli, A. Colpani, M.C. Meloni, F. Seddone, S. Babudieri, G. Madeddu
    Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical, Surgical, and Experimental Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy

    14:15 - 15:15

    Sponsored Symposium

    Continuous innovation for long-term treatment success

    Con la sponsorizzazione di:

    Sponsored Symposium

    Continuous innovation for long-term treatment success

    The advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART), once-daily single tablet regimens (STRs) combining efficacy and long-term safety in a simpler and simpler way, represents some of the most significant milestones that have helped bring radical change in the outlook for people living with HIV. However, there are still some clinical and virological needs in the achievement of the long-term treatment success. The Symposium is designed both to rethink the determinants of long-term treatment success and take a look to the present and future therapeutic options. It's a matter of quality or quantity?

    Chair: S. Rusconi

    14.15 - 14.20 Introduction
    S. Rusconi
    14.20 - 14.40 Driving Innovation
    F. Rogatto
    14.40 - 14.50 Clinical and virological debate: what is meant by long-term treatment success from a virological point of view?
    C.F. Perno
    14.50 - 15.00 Clinical and virological debate: what is meant by long-term treatment success from a clinical point of view?
    M. Andreoni
    15.00 - 15.10 Today's choices for the long treatment success
    S. Lo Caputo
    15.10 - 15.15 Take-home messages
    S. Rusconi
    15:20 - 16:20

    Symposium

    Behavioral and social impact of COVID-19 in PLWH

    Symposium

    Behavioral and social impact of COVID-19 in PLWH

    COVID-19 has heavily impacted the lives of PLHIV for a number of different reasons, ranging from the difficulty in accessing infectious disease units and keeping in contact with their doctors, to changes in relational and behavioural habits - traumas to which people with HIV have been exposed in the past. Prolonged periods of lockdown, social distancing, forced isolation and being in the condition to transmit a virus to others again have evoked old fears. COVID-19 has also highlighted and increased health inequalities: vulnerable people have to struggle to take care of basic needs such as food and shelter, while little has been done to ensure equity and address the health and socioeconomic disparities of vulnerable communities. This symposium tries to shed some light on these different aspects.

    Chairs: P. Meli, A. Saracino

    15.20 - 15.25 Introduction
    15.25 - 15.40 Health inequalities in the COVID-19 era
    V. Peragine
    15.40 - 15.55 Mental health in the COVID era
    A. Bove, A. Perziano
    15.55 - 16.10 Role of digital technologies (telemedicine): pro and cons
    F. Gabbrielli, F.v. Schloesser
    16.10 - 16.20 Discussion on Symposium issues
    16:25 - 17:25

    Symposium

    SARS-CoV-2 infection in persons living with HIV

    Symposium

    SARS-CoV-2 infection in persons living with HIV

    Despite several reports have been produced that investigate Covid-19 in HIV-infected patients, there is still no consensus whether HIV+ individuals do indeed display a most severe disease course as compared to HIV-uninfected peers. Likewise, given the HIV-driven immune dysfunction, not much is known about the immune response to Covid-19 vaccination in HIV+ patients. The most recent data describing Covid-19 clinical and immunological correlates in persons living with HIV (PLWH) will be presented within this Symposium, together with data describing the immunologic response to Covid-19 vaccination in this group of patients. Retention in care has long been considered a major goal in the best management of PLWH, that has been suggested to be potentially overhung by shifts in clinical efforts towards Covid-19 patients. The Symposium will approach the most recent findings describing retention in care in PLWH during Covid-19 pandemic as well as strategies to most efficaciously support it.

    Chairs: A. Calcagno, A. De Rossi

    16.25 - 16.30 Introduction
    16.30 - 16.45 Impact of HIV and comorbidities in COVID-19 clinical course
    A.M. Geretti
    16.45 - 17.00 HIV and SARS-CoV-2: two viruses challenging the immune system
    C. Agrati
    17.00 - 17.15 Retention in care during COVID-19 pandemic
    E. Girardi, F. Schloesser
    17.15 - 17.25 Discussion on Symposium issues
    17:30 - 18:30

    Symposium

    Novel long-acting therapies for the treatment of Multidrug-Resistant (MDR) HIV-1 infection: let's go undetectable again

    Symposium

    Novel long-acting therapies for the treatment of Multidrug-Resistant (MDR) HIV-1 infection: let's go undetectable again

    The Symposium will focus on the new long-acting antiretrovirals designed to treat HIV+ persons harboring a virus resistant to other HIV treatments. Among others the symposium will share details on post attachment inhibitors through a unique mechanism of action blocks HIV-1 entry into cells, while preserving normal immune function. Effective against multiple drug-resistant strains, regardless of viral tropism, with high tolerability and safety,  it represents a novel approach in the management  of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) HIV infection.

    Chair: M. Andreoni

    17.30 - 17.35 Introduction
    M. Andreoni
    17.35 - 17.50 New mechanism of action for durable viral suppression
    C.F. Perno
    17.50 - 18.05 The real world experience: lessons for clinical practice
    A. Castagna
    18.05 - 18.20 Long acting ARVs: the importance of pharmacokinetics, adherence and drug-drug interactions in a new era
    G. Di Perri
    18.20 - 18.30 Discussion on Symposium issues
  • Polissena A Hall
    10:05 - 11:05

    Oral Communications

    Clinical HIV

    Oral Communications

    Clinical HIV

    Chairs: M. Malena, C. Sagnelli

    10.05 - 10.20 Redesigning pregnancy in PLWH 2021
    F. Vichi
    10.20 - 10.30

    OC 1

    Coinfection with Hepatitis B Virus and/or Hepatitis C Virus is a risk factor for HIV virological rebound in course of antiretroviral therapy
    V. Malagnino1, A. Cozzi-Lepri10, V. Svicher2, E. Girardi3, C.F. Perno4, A. Saracino5, G. Cuomo6, S. Rusconi7, M. Puoti8, A. d'Arminio Monforte9, M. Andreoni1, L. Sarmati1 for the ICONA Foundation Study Group
    1Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 2Departmente of Experimental Medicine, University of Tor Vergata, Rome, 3Department of Epidemiology and Pre-Clinical Research, National Institute for Infectious Diseases "L. Spallanzani", Rome, Italy, 4IRCCS Bambino Gesu Children's Hospital, Rome, Italy, 5Infectious Diseases, Università degli Studi "Aldo Moro" di Bari, Italy, 6Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Di Modena, Modena, Italy, 7Infectious Diseases Unit, Legnano General Hospital, ASST Ovest Milanese, Università degli studi Di Milano, Legnano, 8Department of Infectious Diseases, Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 9ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 10University College London, London, UK

    10.32 - 10.42

    OC 2

    Transitions in frailty phenotype states and its association with frailty index: A multi-state Markov model study
    J. Milic1,2, S. Renzetti3, S. Barbieri1, E. Aprile4, M. Belli4, M.Venuta4, M. Menozzi4, A. Santoro4, C. Mussini4, S. Calza3, G. Guaraldi1,2,4
    1Department of Surgical, Medical, Dental and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 2Modena HIV Metabolic Clinic (MHMC), University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy, 3Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy, 4Department of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico of Modena, Modena, Italy

    10.44 - 10.54

    OC 3

    Intrapartum use of zidovudine in HIV pregnant women in Italy. Is it still being used in the era of U=U?
    L. Taramasso1, F. Bovis2, A. di Biagio3, F. Mignone4, C. Giaquinto5, C. Tagliabue6, V. Giacomet7, O. Genovese8, E. Chiappini9, S. Salomè10, R. Badolato11, I. Carloni12, M. Cellini13, I. Dodi14, G. Bossi15, A. Allodi16, S. Bernardi17, R. Consolini18, M. Dedoni19, G. Banderali20, A. Mazza21, M. De Martino22, C. Lisi23, P.A. Tovo24, M. Bassetti3, C. Gabiano24, L. Galli9, on behalf of The Italian Register for HIV Infection in Children
    1Infectious Diseases Clinic, Policlinico San Martino Hospital-IRCCS, Genoa, Italy, 2Biostatistics Unit, Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases Clinic, Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, San Martino Hospital-IRCCS, Genoa, Italy, 4AOU Citta della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Italy, 5University of Padova, Italy, 6Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, UOSD Pediatria Alta Intensità di Cura, Milan, Italy, 7Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences L Sacco, Unit of Paediatric Infectious Disease, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 8Policlinico Gemelli di Roma, Italy, 9Paediatric Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Health Sciences, Anna Meyer Children University Hospital, Florence, Italy, 10Division of Neonatology, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy, 11Pediatrics Clinic, University of Brescia and ASST-Spedali Civili of Brescia, Brescia, Italy, 12Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti di Ancona, Italy, 13U.O. Oncoematologia Pediatrica Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Modena, Italy, 14Pediatria Generale e d'Urgenza, Ospedale dei Bambini Pietro Barilla, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Parma, Italy, 15UOC Pediatria, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy, 16Unit of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy, 17Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù Malattie Infettive e ImmunoInfettivologia DPUO, Roma, Italy, 18Ospedale Santa Chiara, Università di Pisa, Italy, 19Pediatric Clinic, Cagliari University, Italy, 20Department of Paediatrics, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 21Paediatic Unit, S. Chiara Hospital, Trento, Italy, 22Department of Pediatrics, University of Florence, Florence, Italy, 23Department of Statistics, University of Florence, Florence, Italy, 24Department of Pediatrics, University of Turin, Turin, Italy

    11:10 - 12:10

    Oral Communications

    Coinfections and Hepatitis

    Oral Communications

    Coinfections and Hepatitis

    Chair: G. Taliani

    11.10 - 11.25 New anti-HBV drugs: virological and immunological bases
    V. Svicher
    11.25 - 11.35

    OC 9

    Enrichment of positively charged amino acids in HBsAg C-terminus correlates with HBV-induced liver cancer, hampers HBsAg secretion and alters its structural stability
    L. Piermatteo1, L. Carioti1, G. Leoni1, L. Duca1, P. Saccomandi1, G. Cappiello2, P. Trimoulet3, H. Fleury3, S. Francioso4, I. Lenci4, M. Andreoni5, M. Angelico4, A. Minutolo1, C. Matteucci1, L. Sarmati5, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein1, V. Svicher1, R. Salpini1
    1Tor Vergata University, Department of Experimental Medicine, Rome, Italy, 2Microbiology and Virology Unit, "Sandro Pertini" Hospital, Rome, Italy, 3Hôpital Pellegrin tripode, Laboratoire de Virologie, Bordeaux, France, 4Tor Vergata University Hospital, Hepatology Unit, Rome, Italy, 5Tor Vergata University Hospital, Infectious Diseases Unit, Rome, Italy

    11.37 - 11.47

    OC 10

    HBcrAg strongly correlates with higher HDV replicative activity and with enhanced liver inflammation and damage: implications for HBcrAg as a biomarker of disease progression in the setting of HDV co-infection
    R. Salpini1, L. Piermatteo1, U.S. Gill2, A. Battisti1,2, M. Alkhatib1, S. D’Anna1, R. Scutari1, E. Andreassi1, K.M.A. Ho2, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein1, C. Usai2, P.T.F. Kennedy2, V. Svicher1
    1University of Rome Tor Vergata, Department of Experimental Medicine, Rome, Italy, 2Barts Liver Centre, Immunobiology, Blizard Institute, Barts and The London SMD, QMUL, London, United Kingdom

    11.49 - 11.59

    OC 11

    Endocrine pathways of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in people living with HIV
    J. Milic1,2, L. Gozzi1,2, S. Renzetti3, S. Calza3, D. Ferrari1, S. Barbieri1, A. Cervo4, G. Franceschi4, V. Iadisernia4, C. Diazzi5,6, V. Rochira5,6, C. Mussini1,4, G. Sebastiani7, G. Guaraldi1,2,4
    1Department of Surgical, Medical, Dental and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 2Modena HIV Metabolic Clinic (MHMC), University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy, 3Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy, 4Department of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico of Modena, Modena, Italy, 5Department of Endocrinology, Ospedale Civile di Baggiovara , Modena, Italy, 6Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neuroscience Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 7McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

    12:15 - 13:15

    Oral Communications

    Clinical HIV & Clinical COVID I

    Oral Communications

    Clinical HIV & Clinical COVID I

    Chairs: G. Lapadula, M.C. Moioli

    12.15 - 12.30 Therapeutic approaches with monoclonal antibodies in HIV and SARS-CoV-2 infections
    A.M. Cattelan
    12.30 - 12.40

    OC 12

    Higher risk of MAbs clinical failure associated to bamlanivimab/etesevimab exposure and to infection by SARS-CoV-2 P.1/Gamma variant of concern in a real life setting
    V. Mazzotta1, S. Lanini1, S. Rosati1, P. Lorenzini1, E. Lalle2, C. Cimaglia3, I. Mastrorosa1, A. Corpolongo1, B. Bartolini2, A. Vergori1, G. Maffongelli1, S. Vita1, M. Fusto1, E.Girardi3, C. Castilletti2, F. Vaia4, E. Nicastri1, A. Antinori1
    1Clinical Department, 2Laboratory of Virology, 3Clinical Epidemiology, 4Medical Direction, National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani IRCCS, Roma, Italy

    12.42 - 12.52

    OC 13

    Bamlanivimab and Etesevimab administered in an outpatient setting for SARS-CoV-2 infection
    D.F. Bavaro1, L. Diella1, A.G. Solimando2, S. Cicco2, E. Buonamico3, C. Stasi4, M. Ciannarella4, M. Marrone5, F. Carpagnano7, O. Resta3, G.E. Carpagnano3, V.O. Palmieri4, A. Vacca2, M. Dell’Aera6, A. Dell’Erba5, G. Migliore8, M. Aricò9, A. Saracino1
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Bari, Italy, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine 'G. Baccelli' University Hospital Policlinico, Bari, Italy, 3Department of Basic Medical Science, Institute of Respiratory Disease, Neuroscience, and Sense Organs, University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Bari, Italy, 4Clinica Medica 'A. Murri', Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy, 5Interdisciplinary Department of Medicine, University of Bari – Section of Legal Medicine, Bari General Hospital, Bari, Italy, 6Direttore Farmacia Ospedaliera AOU Policlinico di Bari – Bari, Italy, 7Section of Health Management, Policlinico Hospital, Bari, Italy, 8General Direction, Policlinico Hospital, Bari, Italy, 9Strategic Direction, Policlinico Hospital, Bari, Italy

    12.54 - 13.04

    OC 14

    Real life use of monoclonal antibodies and their impact on SARS-CoV-2 clearance kinetics: a single centre experience
    M. Mazzitelli1,2, D. Leoni1, M. Canova1, P. Furlan3, S. Cocchio3, E. Franchin4, B. Deris3, A.M. Cattelan1
    1Infectious and Tropical Diseases Unit, Padua Hospital, Padua, Italy, 2Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Magna Graecia University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy, 3Department of Medicine and Public Health, Padua University Hospital, Padua, Italy, 4Microbiology and Virology Unit, Padua University Hospital, Padua, Italy

    14:15 - 15:15

    Oral Communications

    Epidemiology/Social sciences II

    Oral Communications

    Epidemiology/Social sciences II

    Chairs: A. Cascio, A. Colucci

    14.15 - 14.25

    OC 15

    Correlates of treatment and disease burden in PLWH in Italy
    A. Cingolani1, A. Tavelli2, F. Maggiolo3, V. Calvino4, A. Di Biagio5, A.M. Cattelan6, L. Sighinolfi7, G. Marchetti8, S. Nozza9, R. Rossotti10, A. d’Arminio Monforte8, A. Antinori10, on behalf of Icona Network
    1Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli - Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Roma, 2Fondazione Icona, Milano, 3ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, 4ANLAIDS Onlus, Roma, 5Ospedale San Martino, Genova, 6Azienda Ospedaliera Padova, 7Azienda Ospedaliera Ferrara, 8Università di Milano, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milano, 9HSR San Raffaele IRCCS, Milano, 10ASST Niguarda “Ca Granda”, Milano. 10 IRCCS L. Spallanzani INMI, Roma

    14.27 - 14.37

    OC 16

    The fourth “95” is at reach
    F. Maggiolo1, R. Teocchi1, P. Meli2, D. Valenti3, F. Radici4, I. Mercurio5, A.P. Callegaro1
    1ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, 2Comunità Emmaus & Caritas Bergamasca, 3Associazione FROM, 4Arcigay Bergamo Cives, 5CRI-Comitato di Bergamo, Bergamo

    14.39 - 14.49

    OC 17

    Narratives of HIV-positive patients in the DIAMANTE study
    A. Antinori1, D. Ripamonti2, V. Esposito3, S. Rusconi4,5, A. Cascio6, E. Manzillo7, M. Andreoni8, G. Orofino9, A. Cappuccio10, L. Reale10, M.G. Marini10, D. Mancusi11, A. Uglietti11, M. Portaro11, R. Termini11
    1National Institute for Infectious Diseases "Lazzaro Spallanzani" IRCCS HIV/AIDS Department Roma, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Clinic, Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Bergamo, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases and Gender Medicine Unit, D. Cotugno Hospital - AO dei Colli - Naples, Italy, 4Infectious Diseases Unit, DIBIC Luigi Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 5Infectious Diseases Unit, Legnano Hospital ASST Ovest Milanese, 6Infectious Diseases Clinic, AOU Policlinico “P.Giaccone”, Palermo, Italy, 7Infectious Disease and Infectious Emergencies, Azienda Ospedaliera dei Colli, Naples, Italy, 8Infectious Diseases Clinic, Foundation Policlinico Tor Vergata University Hospital, Rome, Italy, 9Amedeo di Savoia Hospital Unit of Infectious Diseases Torino, Italy, 10ISTUD Foundation, Milan, Italy, 11Medical Affairs Department, Infectious Diseases and Vaccines, Janssen-Cilag SpA, Cologno Monzese, Italy

    14.51 - 15.01

    OC 18

    A telephone-based multidimensional interview in elderly people living with HIV from the GEPPO cohort
    M. Ferrara1, J. Milic2, L. Micai1, S. Barbieri2, E. Aprile2, M. Belli2, M. Venuta2, S. Arsuffi3, C. Fornari3, E. Focà3, G. Di Perri1, S. Bonora1, G. Guaraldi2, A. Calcagno1
    1Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Torino and “Amedeo di Savoia” Hospital, Turin, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Clinic, Department of Medical Specialties, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 3Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali Civili Hospital, Brescia, Italy for the GEPPO Cohort

    15:20 - 16:20

    Expert Meeting

    Monoclonal antibodies and their role in COVID-19 patients: results and perspectives

    Expert Meeting

    Monoclonal antibodies and their role in COVID-19 patients: results and perspectives

    The development of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies is currently at the front line of fighting against the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the emergence and proliferation of SARS-CoV-2 variants conferring resistance to some antibodies is deeply concerning. Furthermore, as additional variants of concern will likely continue to emerge, there is a high unmet medical need for therapeutics that, alone or in combination, can remain effective as the virus evolves. The Expert Meeting will present the state of the art of virological research against COVID-19 with a look at the promising clinical data emerging from the use of monoclonal antibodies and the most recent clinical experiences in the field.

    Chair: M.S. Clerici

    15.20 - 15.25 Introduction
    15.25 - 15.35 From viral pathophysiology to symptoms: rational, candidates, results of early treatment of COVID - 19
    G. Di Perri
    15.35 - 15.45 Emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants and their impact in pandemics therapy
    C.F. Perno
    15.45 - 15.55 Fighting COVID-19 with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies: the importance of high barrier to resistance
    A. Antinori
    15.55 - 16.05 The journey of COVID-19 patients: experiences of clinical practice
    S. Lo Caputo
    16.05 - 16.20 Discussion
    16:25 - 17:25

    Expert Meeting

    Vaccines roadmap: the humanity game-changer

    Sponsorizzato da:

    Expert Meeting

    Vaccines roadmap: the humanity game-changer

    History is characterized by epidemic and pandemic, documented since the second century with the Antonine plague, caused by unknown pathogenic that over the years we have been able to better know and manage. The crucial course that revolutionized the humanity history saving billion of lives from certain death began with the smallpox vaccine. The scientific progress made possible the eradication of some infections that nowadays belong to the past. The aim of the Expert Meeting is to deepen the knowledge on epidemiologic and clinical data, looking at how the vaccines can still make the difference in managing the HIV and SARS-COV 2 pandemics.

    Chair: A.M. Cattelan

    16.25 - 16.30 Introduction
    A.M. Cattelan
    16.30 - 16.45 Epi-pills: deep dive on vaccine studies
    B. Simone
    16.45 - 17.00 HIV Vaccine: a long path
    A. Castagna
    17.00 - 17.15 COVID-19 Vaccine: dynamic journey
    P. Bonanni
    17.15 - 17.25 Questions & Answers
    17:30 - 18:30

    Symposium

    Co-infections in 2021

    Symposium

    Co-infections in 2021

    Chairs: M. Puoti, L. Sarmati

    17.30 - 17.35 Introduction
    17.35 - 17.50 40 years of opportunistic infections
    M. Lichtner
    17.50 - 18.05 The challenges related to the upcoming HDV drugs
    S. Schivazappa
    18.05 - 18.20 New perspectives in non-tuberculous mycobacteria in HIV and non-HIV patients: focus on new therapeutic approaches
    R. Parrella
    18.20 - 18.30 Discussion on Symposium issues
  • Polissena B Hall
    10:05 - 11:05

    Oral Communications

    Epidemiology/Social sciences I

    Oral Communications

    Epidemiology/Social sciences I

    Chair: L. Sighinolfi

    10.05 - 10.15

    OC 4

    Long-term follow-up in a community-based PrEP cohort: controlled increase in risk exposure
    P. Vinti1,2; A. Tavelli1,3; A. De Bona1,3; R. Rossotti1,4, D. Calzavara1, R. Repossi1,2, A. Bianchi1,2, S.Bossolasco1,5, D. Tesoro1,3, A. Foschi1,6, D. Canetti1,5, A. Antonino1,2, F. Rossi1,2, M. Massa1, C. Ferrara1,2, E. Suardi1,3, D. Zagato2, A. d’Arminio Monforte1,3, M. Cernuschi1,2,5 on behalf of the Milano Check Point Group
    1Milano Check Point, Milano, 2ASA Onlus, Milano, 3ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milano, 4ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milano, 5IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano, 6ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milano

    10.17 - 10.27

    OC 5

    Chemsex use in a HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) program based in Milan
    C. Muccini1,2, A. Tavelli1,3, R. Rossotti1,4, A. De Bona1,3, D. Calzavara1, P. Vinti1, M. Lanza1, A. D’Arminio Monforte1,3, M. Cernuschi1,2 on behalf of the Milano Checkpoint Group
    1Milano Checkpoint, Milano, 2IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano, 3ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milano, 4ASST Niguarda Hospital, Milano

    10.29 - 10.39

    OC 6

    Between loss to follow-up and persistence of risky sexual behaviors: how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted access to PrEP
    E. Bacca, M. Menozzi, G. Cuomo, M. Digaetano, L. Gozzi, C. Mussini
    Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Modena, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia

    10.41 - 10.51

    OC 7

    Impact of COVID pandemic on sexual habits and pre-exposure prophylaxis retention in care in a community-based service
    R. Rossotti1,2, A. Tavelli2, D. Calzavara2, A. De Bona2,3, P. Vinti2, C. Muccini2,4, D. Tesoro2,3, S. Bossolasco2,4, M. Cernuschi2,4, A. d’Arminio Monforte2,3
    1ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, 2Milano Checkpoint, Milan, 3ASST Santi Carlo e Paolo, Milan, 4IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan

    10.53 - 11.03

    OC 8

    School-based sexuality education in Italy 2016-2020: a highly heterogeneous scenario
    A. Chinelli1, M. Farinella2, L. Rancilio3, M. C. Salfa4, A. Cellini5, P. Meli6, R. Galipò7, A. Camposeragna8, M. Oldrini9, L. Colaprico10, L. Ceccarelli11, A. T. Palamara12, A. Caraglia13, B. Suligoi14, L. Tavoschi15
    1Università di Pisa, Pisa, 2Circolo di Cultura Omosessuale Mario Mieli, Roma, 3Caritas Ambrosiana, Milano, 4Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Roma, 5Università La Sapienza, Roma, 6Coordinamento Italiano Case Alloggio/AIDS (CICA), Bergamo, 7Associazione Nazionale per la Lotta contro l'AIDS (ANLAIDS), Roma, 8Coordinamento Nazionale Comunità di Accoglienza (CNCA), Roma, 9Lega Italiana per la Lotta contro l’AIDS (LILA), Roma, 10Croce Rossa Italiana (CRI), Roma, 11Università di Pisa, Pisa, 12Università La Sapienza, Roma, 13Ministero della Salute, Roma, 14Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Roma, 15Università di Pisa, Pisa

    11:10 - 12:10

    Expert Meeting

    MDR pathogens in the COVID-19 era: experiences with Cefiderocol

    Con la sponsorizzazione non condizionante di:

    Expert Meeting

    MDR pathogens in the COVID-19 era: experiences with Cefiderocol

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a growing global problem to which the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic may further contribute. Every year, drug-resistant microbes are responsible for an estimated 700,000 deaths and future projections for the impact of unresolved AMR are as high as 10 million deaths per year by 2050. One of the most significant threats in global health is the carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacteria and lack of efficient antibiotics. The World Health Organization designated carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii as high-priority pathogens, which urgently need new antimicrobial development. The Expert Meeting aims to provide information on real life cases treated with Cefiderocol, a recent new option for patients with multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections.

    Chair: P. Viale

    11.10 - 11.25 From in vitro activity to clinical efficacy
    P. Viale
    11.25 - 11.35 Real-life experiences with Cefiderocol in Pseudomonas infections
    M. Meschiari
    11.35 - 11.45 Real-life experiences with Cefiderocol in Acinetobacter baumannii infections
    G. Tiseo
    11.45 - 11.55 Cefiderocol place in therapy
    M. Giannella
    11.55 - 12.05 Questions & Answers
    12.05 - 12.10 Take-home messages
    P. Viale
    12:15 - 13:15

    Expert Meeting

    The first of a new generation NNRTI: the opportunity to get to the heart of PLWH

    Con la sponsorizzazione non condizionante di:

    Expert Meeting

    The first of a new generation NNRTI: the opportunity to get to the heart of PLWH

    PLWH may be predisposed to higher risk of Cardiometabolic Disorders such as dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. In fact, metabolic syndrome affects up to 52% of PLWH. EACS guidelines suggest an ARV modification in case of CVD risk. Here, we review the efficacy and safety profile of the new generation of NNRTI, with a focus on Cardiometabolic Disorders.

    Moderatore: M. Andreoni

    12.15 - 12.20 Introduction
    M. Andreoni
    12.20 - 12.35 The first of a new generation NNRTI: the opportunity to get to the heart of PLWH
    A. Antinori
    12.35 - 13.05 Discussion
    13.05 - 13.15 Take-home messages and conclusions
    M. Andreoni
    14:15 - 15:15

    Expert Meeting

    Hyperinflammation and COVID-19: from research to clinical practice

    Expert Meeting

    Hyperinflammation and COVID-19: from research to clinical practice

    The natural history of COVID-19 includes an initial stage of viral replication that can be followed by a second stage of immunopathology driven by a hyperinflammatory response to SARS-CoV-2 infection. This is characterized by excessive release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (i.e. IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF, GM-CSF, and IFN-g). This increasing evidence has prompted the investigation of immunomodulatory therapies in order to 1) attenuate the exaggerated immune response of the host; 2) identify the most appropriate immunomodulating strategies; 3) the optimal timing of such interventions, and achieve the more robust clinical benefits in patients with COVID-19.

    Chairs: A. Cossarizza, A. Gori

    14.15 - 14.20 Introduction
    14.20 - 14.35 COVID-19 and IL-1, targeting the inflammatory cascade
    G. Cavalli
    14.35 - 14.50 Tracing the pathway to the SAVE-MORE study results
    E. Nicastri
    14.50 - 15.05 On the way to real-world experiences
    A. Bandera
    15.05 - 15.15 Discussion
    15:20 - 16:20

    Expert Meeting

    Roundtable New treatment options for heavily pretreated patients

    Con la sponsorizzazione non condizionante di:

    Expert Meeting

    Roundtable New treatment options for heavily pretreated patients

    Patients with multidrug-resistant HIV currently make up a smaller but still challenging part of the population living with HIV. Challenges with tolerability, safety, and drug-to-drug interactions may further decrease the number of acceptable antiretroviral therapies available to design effective treatment regimens. There remains an unmet need for these individuals who are considered heavily treatment-experienced (HTE) and who are unable to successfully suppress their HIV.  Until the past couple of years, there were a limited number of targets on the human immunodeficiency virus that could be hit by available medications. Recently, several new targets have emerged: the Experts will review the clinical data obtained with the different strategies pursued in this clinical setting.

    Discussants: A. Castagna, F. Maggiolo, G.C. Marchetti, C. Mussini

    16:25 - 17:25

    Oral Communications

    Antiretroviral Therapy I

    Oral Communications

    Antiretroviral Therapy I

    Chair: E.M. Erne

    16.25 - 16.35

    OC 19

    Trajectories of CD4/CD8 ratio at 96 weeks after switch to dolutegravir-based dual therapies in a multicentre cohort of ART-experienced patients
    L. Taramasso1, A. Falletta2, A. Di Biagio2, E. Ricci3, G. Orofino4, N. Squillace5, B. Menzaghi6, G.V. De Socio7, C. Molteni8, G.F. Pellicanò9, R. Gulminetti10, G. Madeddu11, E. Sarchi12, F. Vichi13, B.M. Celesia14, P. Bonfanti5 on behalf of CISAI study group
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, Policlinico Hospital San Martino, Genova, Italy, 2Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genova, Genova, Italy, 3Fondazione A.S.I.A. Onlus, 4Division I of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, ASL Città di Torino, 5Infectious Diseases Unit ASST-MONZA, San Gerardo Hospital-University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, 6Unit of Infectious Diseases, ASST della Valle Olona – Busto Arsizio (VA), 7Department of Internal Medicine 2, Infectious Diseases Unit, Perugia “Santa Maria della Misericordia” General Hospital, 8Infectious Diseases Unit, Ospedale A. Manzoni, Lecco, Italy, 9Department of Human Pathology of the Adult and the Developmental Age “G. Barresi”, Unit of Infectious Diseases, University of Messina, Messina, Italy, 10Department of Medical Sciences and Infectious Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo -University of Pavia, 11Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical, Surgical and Experimental Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, 12Infectious Diseases Unit, S.Antonio e Biagio e Cesare Arrigo Hospital, Alessandria, Italy, 13Infectious Diseases Unit, Santa Maria Annunziata Hospital, Bagno a Ripoli, Florence, Italy, 14Unit of Infectious Diseases University of Catania ARNAS Garibaldi Catania, 15Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Graduated Medical Care, Sanremo Hospital, Sanremo, Italy, 16Infectious Diseases Unit, University of Bari, Bari, Italy, 17Infectious Diseases Unit, SS Trinità Hospital, Cagliari, Italy

    16.37 - 16.47

    OC 20

    Increasing Trend of Pretreatment Integrase Inhibitors Resistance in a Cohort of Antiretroviral Therapy-Naïve People Living with HIV
    C. Muccini1,2, F. Fama2, L. Galli1, A. Poli1, A. Mastrangelo2, F. Badalucco2, M. Sampaolo3, A. Castagna1,2, D. Canetti1
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele, Milano, Italy, 2Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milano, Italy, 3Laboratory of Microbiology and Virology, IRCCS San Raffaele, Milano, Italy

    16.49 - 16.59

    OC 21

    Role of genotypic testing results for predicting virological failure in persons living with HIV with HIV-RNA ≤50 copies/mL who require an ART switch
    A. Cozzi-Lepri1, B. Rossetti2, F. Incardona3,4, G. Di Teodoro5,3, D. Di Carlo6, M. Prosperi7, A. Shallvari3, M. Böhm8, C. Seguin-Devaux9, M. Zazzi10, M.M. Santoro11, on behalf of EuResist Network
    1University College London, IGH, London, United Kingdom, 2University Hospital of Siena, Infectious Diseases Unit, Siena, Italy, 3EuResist Network GEIE, Rome, Italy, 4lnformaPRO, Rome, Italy, 5La Sapienza University, Computer Control and Management Engineering Antonio Ruberti, Rome, ltaly, 6L. Sacco Hospital, Centro di Ricerca Pediatrica "Romeo ed Enrica Invernizzi", Milan, Italy, 7University of Florida, Data Intelligence Systems Lab (DISL), Gainesville, United States, 8University Clinics of Cologne, Institute of Virology, Cologne, Germany, 9Luxembourg Institute of Health, Infection and Immunity, Luxemburg, Luxembourg, 10University of Siena, Department of Medical Biotechnology, Siena, Italy, 11University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Department of Experimental Medicine, Roma, Italy

    17.01 - 17.11

    OC 22

    Evaluation of virological response and resistance profile in virologically suppressed HIV-1 infected individuals switching to a bictegravir based regimen in a real-life setting
    D. Armenia1, F. Forbici2, A. Bertoli3,4, G. Berno2, V. Malagnino4, R. Gagliardini2, V. Borghi5, W. Gennari5, S. Cicalini2, A. Buonomini6, E. Teti4, S. Lanini2, A. Latini6, L. Sarmati4, C. Mussini5, M. Andreoni4, A. Antinori2, C.F. Perno7, M.M. Santoro3, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein3
    1Saint Camillus International University of Health Sciences, Rome, Italy, 2National Institute for Infectious Diseases L. Spallanzani, IRCCS, 3University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, 4Polyclinic of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome Italy, 5Polyclinic of Modena, Modena, Italy, 6San Gallicano Dermatological Institute, IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 7Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, Rome, Italy

    17.13 - 17.23

    OC 23

    Evaluation of total HIV-DNA and residual viremia in HIV-1 infected individuals enrolled on the Be-OnE study who continue a two-drug regimen with dolutegravir plus one reverse transcriptase inhibitor or switch to elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide: results over 96 weeks
    M.M. Santoro1, N. Gianotti2, L. Galli2, R. Scutari1, C. Alteri3, A. Poli2, L. Piermatteo1, A. Bigoloni2, C.F. Perno4, A. Lazzarin2, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein1, A. Castagna2,5
    1University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, 2Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele, Milan, 3University of Milan, Milan, 4Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 5Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan

    17:30 - 18:30

    Oral Communications

    Clinical HIV & Clinical COVID II

    Oral Communications

    Clinical HIV & Clinical COVID II

    Chairs: N. Petrosillo, S. Piconi

    17.30 - 17.40

    OC 27

    Impact of home treatment with glucocorticoids on risk of in-hospital death in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia
    A. Dessilani, A. Cozzi-Lepri, I. Baldisserotto, S. Esperti, F. Medioli, A. Mazzocchi, M. Del Monte, V. Borghi, G. Guaraldi, C. Mussini
    Infectious Disease Unit, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy

    17.42 - 17.52

    OC 28

    Treatment of COVID-19 severe pneumonia: do all patients benefit from adding tocilizumab to glucocorticoids? An open label non-randomized study
    S. Volpi, A. Cozzi-Lepri, V. Borghi, G. Guaraldi, G.J. Burastero, G. Dolci, M. Faltoni, G. Franceschi, V. Iadisernia, C. Mussini
    Infectious Disease Unit, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy

    17.54 - 18.04

    OC 29

    SARS-CoV-2 viral decay in COVID-19 patients treated with monoclonal antibodies in relationship to viral variant
    L. Coppola1, M. Iannetta1, E. Teti1, V. Barchi1, V. Malagnino1, A. Sferrazza1, L. Campogiani1, M. Compagno1, L. Piermatteo2, M. Bellocchio2, F. Ceccherini Silberstein2, M. Andreoni1, L. Sarmati1
    1UOC Malattie Infettive e Tropicali, Policlinico Tor Vergata, Roma, 2Cattedra di Virologia, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Roma

    18.06 - 18.16

    OC 30

    Effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccine in health care workers, Milan, Italy
    A. Lombardi1,2, D. Consonni3, P. Bono4, M. Oggioni4, S.U. Renteria4, L. Bordini3, C.D. Nava3, A. Piatti5, A.C. Pesatori3,6, S. Castaldi7,8, A. Muscatello1, M. Carugno3,6, L. Riboldi9, F. Ceriotti4, A. Bandera1,2, A. Gori1,2
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, Foundation IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy, 2Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 3Epidemiology Unit, Foundation IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy, 4Clinical Laboratory, Foundation IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore, Milan, Italy, 5Medical Direction, Foundation IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy, 6Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milano, Milan, Italy, 7Department Biomedical Sciences for Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 8Quality Unit, Foundation IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy, 9Occupational Health Unit, Foundation IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy; 10Centre for Multidisciplinary Research in Health Science (MACH), University of Milan, Milan, Italy

    18.18 - 18.28

    OC 31

    Immunogenicity and safety of the BNT162b2 COVID-19 mRNA vaccine in PLWH
    E. Milano1, A. Ricciardi1, E. De Vita1, R. Casciaro1, E. Pallara1, R. Papagni1, A. Lagioia1, A.M.V. Larocca2, P. Stefanizzi2, S. Tafuri2, A. Saracino1
    1Clinica Malattie Infettive, Azienza Ospedaliero Consorziale Policlinico di Bari, 2Istituto di Igiene, Azienza Ospedaliero Consorziale Policlinico di Bari

  • Room 3
    11:10 - 13:00

    Round Table

    40 years of HIV: reforming law 135/90 to achieve 2030 SDG and AIDS elimination

    Meet the Community

    40 years of HIV: reforming law 135/90 to achieve 2030 SDG and AIDS elimination

    Chairs: G.V. Calvino, L.A.R. Rancilio

    13:15 - 14:15

    Expert Meeting

    ICONA-PROs in the real-life setting

    Con la sponsorizzazione non condizionante di:

    Expert Meeting

    ICONA-PROs in the real-life setting

    As infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) has evolved into a chronic disease there is a strong rationale for evaluating the impact of antiretroviral therapies on broader aspects of patient's lives, including psychological, symptoms, functioning, well-being, satisfaction, etc. and the impact on the patient. Therefore, perceived health-related quality of life (HRQoL) became a prominent and important patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measure in HIV care, defined as any report of the status that comes directly from the patient without interpretation by a clinician or anyone else. This is particularly true in a cohort setting such as ICONA which decided to launch a new project devoted to HRQoL and PROs including the QoL APP, created to better respond to requests of effective digital tool to collect measures of patient- reported outcomes.

    Chairs: A. Cingolani, A. d'Arminio Monforte

    13.15 - 13.20 Introduction
    A. Cingolani, A. d'Arminio Monforte
    13.20 - 13.30 The ICONA QoL Project: rationale, objectives
    A. d'Arminio Monforte
    13.30 - 13.40 Measure the HIV Quality of Life through patient-reported outcomes (PROs)
    A. Cingolani
    13.40 - 14.00 Digital technologies to support the patient: the new ICONA QoL APP
    I. Fanti, A. Tavelli
    14.00 - 14.15 Questions & Answers
    16:25 - 17:25

    Oral Communications

    Epidemiology/Social sciences III

    Oral Communications

    Epidemiology/Social sciences III

    Chairs: B.M. Celesia, B. Suligoi

    16.25 - 16.40 Breastfeeding: the ultimate U=U's goal?
    M.G. Di Benedetto
    16.40 - 16.50

    OC 24

    From u = u to breastfeeding of women with virosuppressed HIV
    T. Prestileo1,2, A. Sanfilippo1, L. Di Marco3,2, Team I Ta C A Immigrant Take Care Advocacy Team 2, A. Argo4,
    1Infectious Disease Unit & Centre for Migration and Health, ARNAS Civico Di Cristina Benfratelli Hospital, Palermo, Italy, 2ANLAIDS (Associazione Nazionale per la Lotta all'AIDS) Sicilia, Palermo, Italy, 3Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Medical Specialties, University of Modena & Reggio Emilia and Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Modena, Italy, 4Department of Health Promotion, Maternal and Child Care, "G. D'Alessandro", Legal Medicine Section, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy

    16.52 - 17.02

    OC 25

    Preferences in long acting agents for HIV treatment in women living with HIV: a cross-sectional evaluation among 6 Italian clinical centers
    A. Cingolani1, F. Bai2, S. Di Giambenedetto1, A.M. Cattelan3, G. D’Ettorre4, M. Malena5, M. Lichtner6, V. Massaroni1, L. Sighinolfi7, C. Putaggio3, A. Lazzaro4, M. Fiscon5, G.Mancarella6, L. Gazzola2, B. Beghetto8, C. Mussini8, A. D’Arminio Monforte2
    1Fondazione Policlinico A. Gemelli IRCCS, Università Cattolica S. Cuore, Roma, 2Università di Milano, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, 3Azienda Ospedaliera Padova, 4Policlinico Universitario Umberto I, 5Osservatorio Infettivologico Aziendale, Azienda ULSS 9, Verona, 6Ospedale S. Maria Goretti, Latina, 7Azienda Ospedaliera Ferrara, 8Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia

    17.04 - 17.14

    OC 26

    HCV infection among women prisoners: a snapshot of the italian ROSE network
    E. Rastrelli1,2, V. Fiore2,3, R. Ranieri2,4, A. Bascià5, R. Bergamaschi6, F. Vignale7, M. Pontolillo7, F. Campanale8, L. Rapisarda9, R. Marocco10, A.M. Ialungo1,2, S. Dell’Isola1,2, Lucania2,11, S. Babudieri 2,13, G. Starnini1,2
    1U.O.C. Medicina Protetta-Malattie Infettive, Ospedale Belcolle, Viterbo, 2SIMSPe (Società Italiana di Medicina e Sanità Penitenziaria), 3Unità di Malattie Infettive, Università di Sassari, Sassari, 4Azienda Ospedaliera Santi Paolo e Carlo Unità di Malattie Infettive, Università di Milano Unità di Malattie Infettive in Ambito Penitenziario, Milano, 5Distretto Socio Sanitaria ASL Lecce, Poliambulatorio “Cittadella della Salute, 6Casa Circondariale Pesaro, 7Clinica di Malattie Infettive, Dipartimento di Medicina ed Scienze dell'Invecchiamento, Università G. d'Annunzio, Chieti, 8Specialistica Ambulatoriale ASL Bat, 9CC Catania, 10Unità di Malattie Infettive, Università La Sapienza, Ospedale S. M., Latina, 11Reggio Calabria ASP Reggio Calabria – Presidio I.P. RC “Panzera” e “Arghillà”

 
Auditorium Concordia
Polissena A Hall
Polissena B Hall
Room 3
09:00
09:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
13:00
13:30
14:00
14:30
15:00
15:30
16:00
16:30
17:00

09:00 - 10:00

Keynote Lectures

10:05 - 11:05 | Symposium

Approaching the Long Acting Therapy in HIV

11:10 - 12:10 | Symposium

Rethinking antiretroviral therapy: new issues, new approaches

12:15 - 13:15 | Satellite Symposium

How the past shapes the future

12:15 - 13:15 | Satellite Symposium

How the past shapes the future

13.15 - 14.15 | Oral Poster

Foyer Auditorium - Oral Poster

14:00 - 14:45 | Symposium

The Italian Fast-Track Cities network

14:50 - 15:50 | Symposium

Long-COVID and HIV: which signatures?

16:20 - 16:40

SIMIT & ICAR-CROI Awards - Closing remarks

10:05 - 11:05 | Oral Communications

Clinical HIV & Clinical COVID III

11:10 - 12:10 | Oral Communications

Immunopathogenesis I

12:15 - 13:15 | Oral Communications

Comorbidities I

14:15 - 14:45 | Oral Communications

Antiretroviral Therapy II

14:50 - 16:20 | Oral Communications

Antiretroviral Therapy III

10:05 - 11:05 | Expert Meeting

Hepatitis D virus in 2021: new challenges in tough-to-treat patients

11:10 - 12:10 | Expert Meeting

Remdesivir from the pivotal trials to the real world experiences: are there other open questions?

12:15 - 13:15 | Oral Communications

Immunopathogenesis II

14:15 - 14:45 | Oral Communications

Comorbidities II

14:50 - 16:20 | Oral Communications

Virology and Pharmacology II

10:05 - 11:05 | Special Session

Riunione operativa Fast-Track

11:10 - 12:10 | Meet the Community

Sex Check for Prep

14:15 - 14:45 | Oral Communications

Virology and Pharmacology I

14:50 - 16:20 | Oral Communications

Epidemiology/Social sciences IV

  • Auditorium Concordia
    09:00 - 10:00

    Keynote Lectures

    Keynote Lectures

    Chairs: P. Bagnarelli, F. Castelli

    09.00 - 09.30 Antiretroviral therapy: future is coming
    A. Castagna
    09.30 - 10.00 From HIV to SARS-CoV-2: how pandemics affected the integration between laboratory and clinics
    M.R. Capobianchi
    10:05 - 11:05

    Symposium

    Approaching the Long Acting Therapy in HIV

    Symposium

    Approaching the Long Acting Therapy in HIV

    Long Acting (LA) therapies offer a key difference to currently available ART regimens: patient choice related to their preferred way to administer medications. The affected community and HIV providers are very interested in exploring the role of long-acting therapies to address some types of barriers to medication adherence. This Symposium will address the rationale and the current data supporting the efficacy and safety of the first complete LA ART regimen, cabotegravir and rilpivirine, and outline associated opportunities and challenges with the implementation of long-acting therapy for the treatment and prevention of HIV.

    Chairs: A. Antinori, G. Rizzardini

    10.05 - 10.10 Introduction
    A. Antinori, G. Rizzardini
    10.10 - 10.30 Evidence of clinical data and impact in PLWH
    S. Nozza
    10.30 - 10.50 What's behind Long Acting
    S. Bonora
    10.50 - 11.05 Discussion on Symposium issues
    11:10 - 12:10

    Symposium

    Rethinking antiretroviral therapy: new issues, new approaches

    Symposium

    Rethinking antiretroviral therapy: new issues, new approaches

    Great strides have been made in HIV prevention and treatment. Life expectancy of people living with Hiv infection, appropriately treated is now almost the same as the general population, a huge success that needs to be maintained and translated into a good quality of life. The range of available antiretroviral therapies has expanded considerably over the years to now include several classes of antiretrovirals. New drugs with unique mechanisms of action likely effective also against HIV strains with resistance will be available very soon and long-acting therapies that could be taken once every month, once every two months or even less will be available in the next years.This Symposium will debate the most critical points for a proper management of HIV prevention and treatment in this dynamic scenario.

    Chairs: G.M. Corbelli, M.E. Quiros Roldan

    11.10 - 11.25 Prevention
    S. Nozza
    11.25 - 11.40 Naive
    V. Spagnuolo
    11.40 - 11.55 Switch
    L. Taramasso
    11.55 - 12.10 Failure
    R. Gagliardini
    12:15 - 13:15

    Satellite Symposium

    How the past shapes the future

    Con la sponsorizzazione non condizionante di:

    Satellite Symposium

    How the past shapes the future

    In this changing scenario caring for HIV is constantly a challenge and with it both the management of long-term antiretroviral therapy and the unmet needs of every single HIV-positive patient and at-risk population. PLWH require long-life treatments while maintaining durability and tolerability of antiretroviral regimen. The aim of symposium is going through the long innovation path focusing on value of ART history in the new global landscape depicted by COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, data obtained from experience will be discussed to better support treatment strategies in daily practice for improving patients care.

    Chair: C. Mussini

    12:15 - 13:15

    Satellite Symposium

    How the past shapes the future

    Con la sponsorizzazione non condizionante di:

    Satellite Symposium

    How the past shapes the future

    In this changing scenario caring for HIV is constantly a challenge and with it both the management of long-term antiretroviral therapy and the unmet needs of every single HIV-positive patient and at-risk population. PLWH require long-life treatments while maintaining durability and tolerability of antiretroviral regimen. The aim of symposium is going through the long innovation path focusing on value of ART history in the new global landscape depicted by COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, data obtained from experience will be discussed to better support treatment strategies in daily practice for improving patients care.

    Chair: C. Mussini

    13:15 - 14:15

    13.15 - 14.15 | Oral Poster

    Foyer Auditorium - Oral Poster

    Oral Poster

    Antiretroviral Therapy II

    Chair: A. Londero

    13.15 - 13.20

    OP 43

    Changes in serum inflammatory and immune activation markers associated with lamivudine/dolutegravir and tenofovir alafenamide/emtricitabine/bictegravir as initial antiretroviral treatment
    L. Calza1, V. Colangeli1, T. Miani1, I. Bon2, T. Lazzarotto2, P. Viale1
    1Unit of Infectious Diseases, S.Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, 2Unit of Microbiology, S.Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna

    13.22 - 13.27

    OP 44

    Cardiovascular risk and lipid profile after switching to TAF/FTC/RPV or TAF/FTC/EVG/cobi in people living with HIV and controlled plasma viremia
    F. Conti1,2, L. Pezzati1,2, G. Pagani3, D. Bernacchia3, L. Oreni2, A. Giacomelli1,2, S. Rusconi1,3
    1Luigi Sacco Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences DIBIC, University of Milan, Italy, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Luigi Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Legnano General Hospital, ASST Ovest Milanese, Legnano, Italy

    13.29 - 13.34

    OP 45

    Who could be eligible for long-acting antiretroviral treatment? A snapchat from Antiviral Response Cohort Analysis (ARCA) Italian cohort
    A. De Vito1, A. Botta2, M. Berruti3,4, V. Castelli5,6, V. Lai7, C. Cassol8,9, A. Lanari8,9, G. Stella8,9, A. Sallvari10,11, A. Bezenchek10,11, A. Di Biagio4
    1Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical, Surgical, and Experimental Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 2Infectious and Tropical Disease Unit, University Hospital Careggi, University of Florence, Florence, Italy, 3Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy, 4Clinica Malattie Infettive, Università degli Sudi di Genova, Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy, 5University of Milano, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Milano, Italy, 6Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Infectious Disease Unit, Milano, Italy, 7Struttura complessa di Microbiologia e Virologia, Dipartimento di scienze Biomediche, Università di Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 8Dipartimento Biotecnologie Mediche, Università degli Studi di Siena, Siena, Italy, 9UOC Malattie Infettive e Tropicali, AOU Senese, Siena, Italy, 10INFORMAPRO s.r.l., Rome, Italy, 11EuResist Network GEIE, Rome, Italy

    13.36 - 13.41

    OP 46

    HIV-DNA decay in ART-naïve patients starting dolutegravir plus lamivudine vs triple therapy
    F. Lombardi1, S. Belmonti2, A. Sanfilippo1, A. Ciccullo1, A. Borghetti1, S. Di Giambenedetto1,2
    1Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, UOC malattie infettive, Roma Italia, 2Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Istituto di Clinica Malattie Infettive, Roma Italia

    13.43 - 13.48

    OP 47

    Real-life impact of drug toxicity on dolutegravir tolerability: clinical practice data from a multicenter Italian cohort
    A. Ciccullo1, G. Baldin2,3, V. Borghi4, F. Lagi5, A. Latini6, G. d’Ettorre7, L. Oreni8, A. Capetti9, M. Fabbiani10, A. Grimaldi1, G. Madeddu11, G. Sterrantino5, S. Rusconi12, C. Mussini4, S. Di Giambenedetto3,13
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, San Salvatore Hospital, L’Aquila, Italy, 2Mater Olbia Hospital, Olbia, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases Unit, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 4Department of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico of Modena, Modena, Italy, 5Division of Tropical and Infectious Diseases, 'Careggi' Hospital, Florence, Italy, 6Infectious Dermatology and Allergology Unit, IFO S. Gallicano Institute (IRCCS), Rome, Italy, 7Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Azienda Policlinico Umberto I, Rome, Italy, 8Infectious Diseases Unit, DIBIC Luigi Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 9Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Infectious Diseases, Luigi Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy, 10Infectious Diseases Unit, University Hospital of Siena, Siena, Italy, 11Department of Clinical, Surgical and Experimental Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 12Infectious Diseases Unit, Legnano General Hospital, ASST Ovest Milanese, and DIBIC Luigi Sacco, University of Milan, Italy, 13Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy

    13.50 - 13.55

    OP 48

    Prevalence and incidence of multidrug resistance in the ARCA database, 2020 update
    F. Incardona1,2, L. Timelli2, I. Vicenti3, S. Di Giambenedetto4, W. Gennari5, F. Lombardi4, V. Micheli6, D. Francisci7, E. Pontali8, S.T. Kiros9, M. Zazzi3; on behalf of the ARCA network
    1EuResist Network GEIE, Rome, 2InformaPRO, Rome, 3University of Siena, Siena, 4University Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, 5Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria di Modena, Modena, 6Hospital L. Sacco, Milan, 7University of Perugia, Perugia, 8Hospital Galliera, Genova, 9Hospital Careggi, Florence

    Oral Poster

    HIV & COVID II

    Chair: M.A. Di Pietro

    13.15 - 13.20

    OP 49

    Real life use of the anti-SARS CoV-2 monoclonal antibodies in the early phase of infection: planning, enrollment, administration and monitoring
    C. Del Borgo1, D. Caianiello2, D. Di Trento2, S. Garattini2, G. Bagaglini3, B. Kertusha2, A. Carraro2, A. Parente2, P. Fabietti1, O. D’Onofrio1, S. Di Somma4, G. Visconti5, G. Bonanni3, M. Lichtner2
    1Infectious Disease Unit, S.M. Goretti Hospital, AUSL Latina, Italy, 2Infectious Disease Unit, Sapienza University, S.M. Goretti Hospital, Latina, Italy, 3Pharmacy Unit, S.M. Goretti Hospital, AUSL Latina, Italy, 4Department of Medical-Surgery Sciences and Translational Medicine, University of Rome Sapienza, Rome, Italy, 5Health management service, AUSL Latina, Italy

    13.22 - 13.27

    OP 50

    Learning by doing: effects of monoclonal antibody treatment on the outcome of ambulatory patients with COVID-19
    C. Leanza, A. Destro, C. Cappuccilli, E. Binetti, S. Trapani, S. Lobello, F. Cogliati Dezza, M.A. Zingaropoli, C. Ajassa, C.M. Mastroianni
    Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, AOU Policlinico Umberto 1, Sapienza University, Rome

    13.29 - 13.34

    OP 51

    Efficacy, safety and virological clearance in course of treatment with anti-SARS-CoV-2 monoclonal antibodies in patients diagnosed with mild-moderate COVID-19
    C. Falcinella1, F. Bai1, D. Tomasoni1, T. Beringheli1, N. Gemignani1, E. Ottaviano2, S. Bianchi2, E. Borghi2, A. d’Arminio Monforte1, G. Marchetti1
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, San Paolo Hospital, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Department of Health Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, 2Laboratory of Microbiology, Department of Health Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan

    13.36 - 13.41

    OP 52

    Ex vivo efficacy of currently licensed anti-SARS-CoV-2 monoclonal antibodies
    F. Dragoni1, I. Vicenti1, A. Gidari2, E. Schiaroli2, G.V. De Socio2, S. Bastianelli2, L. Fiaschi1, N. Bartolini1, M. Zazzi1, D. Francisci2
    1Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Italy, 2Department of Medicine and Surgery, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, "Santa Maria della Misericordia" Hospital, University of Perugia, Italy

    13.43 - 13.48

    OP 53

    Real-life use of remdesivir-containing regimens in Coronavirus Disease-2019: a retrospective case-control study
    F. Cogliati Dezza, A. Oliva, V. Mauro, F.E. Romani,R. Aronica,F. Cancelli, G. Savelloni, P. Pasculli, S. Valeri, S. Carli, S. Di Bari, E. Casali, C.M. Mastroianni
    Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome

    13.50 - 13.55

    OP 54

    SARS-CoV-2 infection Among Persons living with HIV
    S.R. Bruno, E.P. Drago, S. Ferrara, M. Poliseno, J.R. Fiore, S. Sica, S. Lo Caputo, T.A. Santantonio
    Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia

    Oral Poster

    Immunopathogenesis II

    Chair: L. Sasset

    13.15 - 13.20

    OP 55

    Increased rates of indeterminate QuantiFERON-TB Gold Plus assay in severe COVID-19 patients reflect an impaired interferon-gamma secretion and correlate with the profound reduction of T-lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood
    A. Imeneo, G. Alessio, M. Iannetta, A. Di Lorenzo, A. Lodi, F. Barreca, V. Barchi, B. Massa, L. Campogiani, M. Compagno, L. Coppola, V. Malagnino, E. Teti, M. Andreoni, L. Sarmati
    Policlinico Tor Vergata, Roma

    13.22 - 13.27

    OP 56

    Role of serum E-selectin as a biomarker of infection severity in Coronavirus Disease-19
    E. Rando2,3, D. Al Ismail1, M. De Angelis1, M.C. Miele1, C.M. Mastroianni1, A. Oliva1
    1Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy, 2Institute of Infectious Diseases Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Rome, Italy, 3Sapienza School for Advanced Studies (SSAS), Sapienza University of Rome, Italy

    13.29 - 13.34

    OP 57

    Effects of viremia and CD4 recovery on the gut “microbiome-immunity” axis in naïve HIV-1 patients undergoing ART therapy
    E. Russo1, G. Nannini1, G. Sterrantino1, S.T. Kiros1, V. Di Pilato2, M. Coppi1,5, S. Baldi1, E. Niccolai1, F. Ricci1, M. Ramazzotti4, M. Pallecchi4, F. Lagi1, G.M. Rossolini1,5, A. Bartoloni1, G. Bartolucci3, A. Amedei1
    1Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy, 2Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy, 3Department of Neurosciences, Psychology, Drug Research and Child Health Section of Pharmaceutical and Nutraceutical Sciences, Florence, Italy, 4Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical "Mario Serio" University of Florence, Florence, Italy, 5Microbiology and Virology Unit, Florence Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy

    13.36 - 13.41

    OP 58

    Cytokine profile of COVID-19 patients with and without active tuberculosis
    S. Villa1, A. Lombardi1,2,3, P. Zucchi4, L. Porretti5, E. Trombetta5, A. Bandera1,2,3, P. Viggiani4, M. Raviglione1, A. Gori1,2,3
    1Centre for Multidisciplinary Research in Health Science (MACH), University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 2Infectious Disease Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy, 3Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 4Phthisiology Unit, Sondalo Hospital, ASST Valtellina e Alto Lario, Sondrio, Italy, 5Clinical Laboratory, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy

    13.43 - 13.48

    OP 59

    Role of Tocilizumab in down regulating the concentration of sCD163 in a cohort of SARS-COV 2 infected patients with varying severity
    P. Nijhawan1, A. Carraro2, M.A. Zingaropoli1, P. Zuccalà2, V. Perri1, E. Chichi2, A. Parente2, R. Marocco2, B. Kertusha2, G. Siccardi1, C. Del Borgo2, V .Belvisi2, E. Del Giudice2, L. Fondaco2, S. Carli2, C. Ajassa1, F. Mengoni1, M.R. Ciardi1, C.M. Mastroianni1, M. Lichtner1,2
    1Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, 2Infectious Disease Unit, SM Goretti Hospital Latina, Latina

    13.50 - 13.55

    OP 60

    Clinical and immunological characterization of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children
    C. Vanetti1,2, F. Limanaqi2, S.C. Pagliara1, C. Fenizia1,2, C. Loretelli2, M. Stracuzzi3, L. Paradiso3, E. Longoni3, L. Barcellini4, V. Lampasona5, L. Piemonti5, I. Marzinotto5, S. Dispinseri6, G. Scarlatti6, P. Fiorina2, M. Biasin2, V. Giacomet3, M. Clerici1,7, G.V. Zuccotti2,4, D. Trabattoni2
    1Chair of Immunology - Department of of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, 2Chair of Immunology, DIBIC L. Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, 3Paediatric Infectious Disease Unit, Ospedale L. Sacco, Milan, 4Department of Pediatrics, Ospedale dei Bambini V. Buzzi, Milan, 5Diabetes Research Institute, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, 6Viral Evolution and Transmission Unit, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, 7IRCCS Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi

    Oral Poster

    Immunopathogenesis III

    Chair: M. Massari

    13.15 - 13.20

    OP 61

    Binding and neutralizing antibodies to interferon (IFN) α/β and defective IFN transcriptional profile in COVID-19 patients
    F. Frasca1, M. Scordio1, G. Oliveto1, L. Sorrentino1, A. Viscido1, C. Bitossi1, A. D’Auria1, G. Bugani1, A. Pierangeli1, L. Celani2, G. Ceccarelli2, C. Pinacchio2, L. Santinelli2, C. Mastroianni2, G. D’ Ettorre2, G. Antonelli1,3, C. Scagnolari1
    1Virology Laboratory, Department of Molecular Medicine, 2Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy, 3Microbiology and Virology Unit, Sapienza University Hospital “Policlinico Umberto I”, Rome, Italy

    13.22 - 13.27

    OP 62

    Plasma cytokine landscape reveals the importance of different molecular pathways in predicting COVID-19 severity and survival
    A. Cozzi-Lepri1, S. De Biasi2, M. Meschiari3, A. Paolini2, R. Borella2, M. Mattioli2, D. Lo Tartaro2, L. Fidanza2, A. Neroni2, C. Simonini2, S. Busani4, M. Girardis4, G. Guaraldi3, C. Mussini3, A. Cossarizza2, L. Gibellini2
    1Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences for Children and Adults, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia School of Medicine, Modena, Italy, 2Institute for Global Health, University College of London, London, UK, 3Infectious Diseases Clinics, AOU Policlinico and University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 4Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, AOU Policlinico and University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy

    13.29 - 13.34

    OP 63

    Pregnant women develop a specific immunological long-lived memory against SARS-CoV-2
    C. Fenizia1,2, C. Vanetti1,2, I. Cetin3, D. Mileto4, I. Saulle1,2, M. di Giminiani5, M. Saresella6, F. Parisi5, D. Trabattoni2, M. Clerici1,6, M. Biasin2, V. Savasi5
    1Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 2Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 3Department of Woman, Mother and Neonate Buzzi Children’s Hospital, ASST Fatebenefratelli‐Sacco, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Milan, Italy, 4Clinical Microbiology, Virology and Bio-emergence Diagnosis, ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 5Unit of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Department of Biological and Clinical Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 6IRCCS Fondazione don Carlo Gnocchi, Milan, Italy

    13.36 - 13.41

    OP 64

    Role of Type-I and -II interferons in SARS-CoV-2 infection: convergent effect, different mechanisms
    F. Limanaqi1,2, G. Cappelletti2, M. Garziano1,2, S. Strizzi2, C. Fenizia1,2, D. Trabattoni2, M. Clerici1,3, M. Biasin2
    1Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 2Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences L. Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 3IRCCS Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi ONLUS, Milan, Italy

    13.43 - 13.48

    OP 65

    Persistence of humoral immune response after one year from COVID-19 diagnosis: evidence from a monocentric study
    R. Ungaro1, S. Villa2, Valeria Castelli1,3, P. Saltini1,3, A. Muscatello1, M. Mantero3,4, S. Aliberti5,6, A. Nobili7, C. Canetta8, A. L. Fracanzani3,9, M. Oggioni10, A. Gori1,2,3, A. Bandera1,2,3 on behalf of the COVID-19 Network working group
    1Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Infectious Disease Unit, Milan, Italy, 2Centre for Multidisciplinary Research in Health Science (MACH), University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 3University of Milano, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Milan, Italy, 4Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Respiratory Unit and Cystic Fibrosis Adult Centre, Internal Medicine Department, Milan, Italy, 5Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Pieve Emanuele, Milan, Italy, 6IRCCS Humanitas Research Hospital, Respiratory Unit, Rozzano, Milan, Italy, 7Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri IRCCS, Milan, Italy, 8Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Acute Medical Unit, Milan, Italy, 9Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Internal Medicine, Milan, Italy, 10Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Clinical Laboratory, Milan, Italy

    13.50 - 13.55

    OP 66

    Immunogenicity and safety of two doses of BNT162b2 vaccine in very elderly subjects
    M. Tagliabue1, A.L. Ridolfo2, L. Oreni2, P. Clerici3, M. De Paschale3, M. Beltrami2, C. Resnati4, S. Belbusti1, L. Milazzo2, S. Antinori2, D. Cattaneo4,5, C. Gervasoni2,5
    1Cesare e Emilio Prandoni ONLUS, Torno, Italy, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy, 3Legnano Hospital, ASST Ovest Milanese, Legnano, Italy, 4Unit of Clinical Pharmacology, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy, 5Gestione Ambulatoriale Politerapie (GAP) Outpatient Clinic, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy

    Oral Poster

    Social Sciences/Miscellaneous

    Chairs: A. Franco, G. Madeddu

    13.15 - 13.20

    OP 67

    Patient outreach strategy to enhance retention to care of HIV-positive adolescent and youths: experience from HIV high burden setting
    F. Di Gennaro1,2, A. Pozniak3, L. Ramirez4, H. Cardoso4, A. Chivite4, V. Cinturao4, D.F. Bavaro1, N. Chimundi4, C. Marotta2, I. Chaguruca4, F. Tognon2, E. Namarime4, E. Occa4, G. Putoto2, A. Saracino1
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Bari, University Hospital Policlinico, Bari, Italy, 2Operational Research Unit, Doctors with Africa CUAMM, Padua, Italy, 3Department of HIV Medicine, Chelsea & Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK, Department Clinical Research, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK, 4Doctors with Africa CUAMM, Beira 2100, Mozambique

    13.22 - 13.27

    OP 68

    Knowledge of HIV and STIs: which are the most vulnerable populations? Results from a web-based survey in Italy
    A. Colpani, A. De Vito, B. Zauli, V. Fiore, G.A. Pintus, V.G. Nardi, S. Babudieri, G. Madeddu
    Unit of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medical, Surgical and Experimental Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari

    13.29 - 13.34

    OP 69

    HIV and Adolescents. Evaluation of an HIV and STI prevention project for high school students
    F. Rossi1, A. Bianchi1, D. Zagato1, R. Repossi1, E. Garavaglia1, M. Cernuschi1,2
    1ASA Associazione Solidarietà AIDS, Milano, Italy, 2San Raffaele Hospital, Milano, Italy

    13.36 - 13.41

    OP 70

    SARS-CoV-2 variants surveillace highlights local emergence of different genotypes
    C. Veneziano1, C. De Marco1, N. Marascio2, A. Cerantonio1, G. Santamaria3, M.C. Liberto2, E.M. Trecarichi4, A. Quirino2, F. Longhini6, A. Russo7, F.S. Costanzo5, G. Matera2, C. Torti4, G. Viglietto1
    1Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, "Magna Graecia", University Catanzaro, Italy, 2Department of Health Sciences, Clinical Microbiology Unit, "Magna Graecia" University, Catanzaro, Italy, 3Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Regenerative Medicine in Cardiovascular Disease, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany, 4Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Infectious and Tropical Disease Unit, "Magna Graecia" University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy, 5Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, CIS for Genomics and Molecular Pathology, "Magna Graecia" University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy, 6Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Intensive Care Unit, University "Magna Graecia" of Catanzaro, Italy, 7Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, "Magna Graecia" University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy

    13.43 - 13.48

    OP 71

    Access to HIV testing before and after SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in Milan: comparison between a health-care setting and a community setting
    L. Biasioli3, A. Tavelli1,3, R. Rossotti1,4, A. De Bona1,3, D. Calzavara1, P. Vinti1, C. Muccini1,2, G. Mulè3, C. Baiguera4, R. Repossi1, A. D’Arminio Monforte1,3, M. Cernuschi1,2 on behalf of the Milano Checkpoint Group
    1Milano Checkpoint, Milano, 2IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano, 3ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milano, 4ASST Niguarda Hospital, Milano

    13.50 - 13.55

    OP 72

    Characterization of PLWH with low-level viremia: results from the Italian ARCA cohort
    M. Ranzenigo1, E. Bruzzesi1, D. Di Carlo2, V. Costabile3, F. Lombardi4, Y. Bouba5, F. Maggiolo6, A.P. Callegaro7, A. Zoncada8, S. Paolucci9, V. Micheli10, S. Renica3, A. Bezencheck11,12, B. Rossetti13, M.M. Santoro14
    1Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy, 2CRC Pediatric "Romeo and Enrica Invernizzi", Department of Biosciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 3Department of Oncology and Hemato-oncology, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 4UOC Malattie Infettive, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 5Chantal BIYA International Reference Centre for research on HIV/AIDS prevention and management (CIRCB), Yaoundé, Cameroon, 6Department of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliera Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 7Department of Laboratory Medicine, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 8UO Malattie Infettive, ASST Cremona, Cremona, Italy, 9Molecular Virology Unit, Division of Microbiology and Virology, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy, 10Department of Clinical Microbiology Virology and Diagnosis of Bioemergency, Luigi Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy, 11IPRO - InformaPRO S.r.l., Rome, Italy, 12EuResist Network GEIE, Rome, Italy, 13Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Medical Sciences, University Hospital of Siena, Siena, Italy, 14Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy

    Oral Poster

    Epidemiology/Social Sciences III

    Chairs: M. Farinella, V. Giacomet, C. Iaria

    13.15 - 13.20

    OP 73

    Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) though the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic period: the experience of the dedicated service of Tuscany Region in S.M.Annunziata Hospital, Florence
    E. Salomoni, C. Costa, L. Attala, B. Romanin, M. Paoletti, M. Brizzi, M.A. Di Pietro, F. Vichi
    SOC Malattie Infettive 1, Ospedale S. Maria Annunziata, Firenze, Azienda USL Toscana Centro

    13.22 - 13.27

    OP 74

    PreP experience at Milano Checkpoint: promoting health and well-being through the integration of complementary skills
    A. Bianchi1,2, A. Tavelli3, P.L. Vinti2, D. Calzavara2, A. Antonino1,2, F. Rossi1,2, M. Massa2, M. Lanza1, A. De Bona3, D. Rossotti4, S. Bossolasco5, D. Canetta5, A. Foschi6, D. Tesoro3, R. Repossi1,2, E. Garavaglia1,2, C. Ferrara1,2, D. De Cia Warzanowski2, M. Cernuschi1,2,5
    1ASA. Associazione Solidarietà AIDS, Milan, Italy, 2Milano Checkpoint, Milan, 3San Paolo Hospital, Milan, Italy, 4ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 5San Raffaele Hospital, Milan, Italy, 6Luigi Sacco Hospital, Milan, Italy

    13.29 - 13.34

    OP 75

    Rapid tests in the pandemic: the "continuum of care" of Villa Maraini during the Covid-19 emergency
    T. Di Giovanni1, E. Teti2, G.F.M. Direnzo1, A.R. Cavasio1,2, P. Sammarco1, D. Masci1, B. Coladarce1, G. Rodoquino1, M. Andreoni2, E. Rossi1, M. Barra1
    1Fondazione Villa Maraini (Rome, Italy), 2Infectious Disease Clinic, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy

    13.36 - 13.41

    OP 76

    Covid-19 in HIV/AIDS out-of-hospital facilities in Lombardy
    L. Rancilio, G. Gaiera, P. Meli
    Coordinamento Case Alloggio per persone con HIV/AIDS della Lombardia (C.R.C.A. Lombardia)

    13.43 - 13.48

    OP 77

    The COVID-19 pandemic impact on retention in care and viral suppression at the Infectious Diseases Unit of S. M. Annunziata Hospital, Florence: comparing 2019 and 2020 data
    C. Costa1, L. Attala1, B. Romanin1, P. Pierotti1, E. Salomoni1, M. Brizzi1, A. Gabbuti1, A. Poggi2, P. Nizzoli2, L. Rabatti2, A. Bellucci3, F. Vichi1, M. Di Pietro1
    1SOC Malattie Infettive 1, Ospedale S. Maria Annunziata, Firenze, Azienda USL Toscana Centro, 2Farmacia Ospedaliera, Ospedale S. Maria Annunziata, Firenze, Azienda USL Toscana Centro, 3SOC Patologia Clinica e Immunoallergologia, Ospedale Nuovo S. Giovanni di Dio, Firenze, Azienda USL Toscana Centro

    13.50 - 13.55

    OP 78

    Reaching 90-90-90 in the municipality of Kilamba Kiaxi, Luanda, Angola. The experience of PIPSA project
    G. Natali1, S. Da Silva2, Y. Tembe2, T. Almeida3, T. Lomba Jamba4, T. Baldoni1, L. Nigro2,5 for the PIPSA Group. The PIPSA Group: E. Do Nascimento, M, Silvestre, S. Rocca, J. Bengui, M. Cardoso, U. Fernandes, M. Fundumuca, B. Gaspar, P. Kalandula, T. Mambo, C. Salvador, R. Salvador, J. Vemba, J. Massango, N. Comandante, B. Gonçalves P. João, M. Miguel, N. Cardoso
    1Unione Medico Missionaria Italiana, Negrar, Italy, 2Cuamm - Medicos com Africa, Luanda, Angola, 3Gabineto Provincial de Saúde, Luanda, Angola, 4Repartição Municipal de Saúde, Kilamba Kiaxi, Luanda, Angola, 5LHIVE Diritti e Prevenzione, Catania, Italy

    Oral Poster

    Virology

    Chairs: V. Cento, B. Rossetti

    13.15 - 13.20

    OP 79

    Molecular evidence of HIV-1 transmission in a criminal case in Italy
    L. Fabeni1, I. Abbate1, G. Rozera1, M. Selleri1, G. Berno1, F. Forbici1, E. Giombini1, A. Bertoli2, R. Salpini2, R. Santangelo3,4, O. Turriziani5, C.F. Perno6, G. Ippolito1, M.R. Capobianchi1
    1Laboratory of Virology, National Institute for Infectious Diseases “Lazzaro Spallanzani” IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2Department of Experimental Medicine and Surgery, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy, 3Fondazione Policlinico Universitario “A. Gemelli” IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 4Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy, 5Laboratory of Microbiology and Virology, Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Rome "Sapienza", Rome, Italy, 6Microbiology and Immunology Diagnostics, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital IRCCS, Rome, Italy

    13.22 - 13.27

    OP 80

    Assessment of specific immunological response after administration of anti-meningococcal quadrivalent conjugate vaccine MENVEO® in a population with vertically-transmitted HIV infection
    C. Vanetti1,2, C. Fenizia1,2, M. Garziano2, I. Saulle1, M. Stracuzzi3, F. Da Pozzo3, L. Paradiso3, E. Longoni3, L. Barcellini4, M. Biasin2, M. Clerici1,5, G.V. Zuccotti2,4, V. Giacomet3, D. Trabattoni2
    1University of Milan, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Milan, 2University of Milan, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences "Luigi Sacco", Milan, Italy, 3Ospedale "Luigi Sacco", University of Milan, Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Milan, 4Ospedale dei Bambini V. Buzzi, University of Milan, Department of Pediatrics, Milan, 5IRCCS Fondazione Don Gnocchi, Milan

    13.29 - 13.34

    OP 81

    Regulation of m6A methylation as new therapeutic option against COVID-19
    C. Zannella1, V. Folliero1, R. Giugliano1, B.M. Nastri1, A. De Filippis1, M. Galdiero1, G. Franci2
    1Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy, 2Department of Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry Scuola Medica Salernitana, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy

    13.36 - 13.41

    OP 82

    Characterization of humoral and cellular immune response after SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine in HIV-1 infected patients
    L. Santinelli1, G.P. Innocenti1, C. Mazzei2, C. Pinacchio1, M. Scordio3, L. Bortolani1, G. Recchia1, L. Battistini1, G. De Girolamo1, C. Scagnolari3, G. Ceccarelli1, C.M. Mastroianni1, M. Andreotti2, G. d’Ettorre1
    1Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy, 2National Center for Global Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy, 3Virology Laboratory, Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy

    13.43 - 13.48

    OP 83

    Safety and tolerability of the Pfizer-BioNTech BNT162b2 COVID-19 vaccine in a diverse cohort of people with HIV (PWH)
    L. Ferrari1, F. Caldara1, E. Teti1, L. Piermatteo2, E. Andreassi2, M. Compagno1, T. Mulas1, G. De Simone1, D. Checchi1, A. Crea1, L. Ceccarelli1, A. Bertoli2,3, M. Iannetta1, F. Ceccherini Silberstein2, L. Sarmati1, M. Andreoni1, A.M. Geretti1,4
    1University of Rome Tor Vergata, Department of Systems Medicine, Infectious Diseases Clinic, Rome, Italy, 2University of Rome Tor Vergata, Experimental Medicine, Rome, Italy, 3Polyclinic Tor Vergata Foundation, Laboratory of Clinical Microbiology and Virology, Rome, Italy, 4King’s College London, Infectious Diseases, School of Immunology & Microbial Sciences, London, United Kingdom

    13.50 - 13.55

    OP 84

    Differences in response to mRNA BNT162b2 vaccine among a cohort of Health Care Workers (HCWs): insights into the potential of a booster dose
    A. Tavelli1, M. Allegrini1, P. Perrone2, V. Bordoni3, A. Longo3, V. Bono1, M. Augello1, L. Romanò2, W. De Francesco4, R. Grande4, C. Colosio3, G. Marchetti1, A. d’Arminio Monforte1
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, San Paolo Hospital, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, Italy, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences for Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 3Occupational Health Unit, International Centre for Rural Health, Department of Health Sciences, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 4Microbiology Unit, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milan, Italy

    14:00 - 14:45

    Symposium

    The Italian Fast-Track Cities network

    Con la sponsorizzazione non condizionante di:

    Symposium

    The Italian Fast-Track Cities network

    The Fast-Track Cities initiative is a global partnership between cities and municipalities around the word and four core partners: the International Association of Providers of AIDS-Care (IAPAC), the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat) and the City of Paris. Launched on Word AIDS Day 2012, the Network has grown to include more than 300 Cities and municipalities that are committed to attain the UNAIDS 95-95-95 targets by 2030. The aim of the Symposium is to discuss the global initiatives and to focus on the Italian Fast-Track Cities state of the art, in a round table involving the different Italian Fast-Track Cities' stakeholders.

    Chair: A. d'Arminio Monforte

    Moderatori: M. Cernuschi, F. Maggiolo

    14.00 - 14.05 Introduction
    A. d'Arminio Monforte
    14.05 - 14.15 The Global Network and ICAR-IAPAC partnership
    B. Audoin
    14.15 - 14.40 Round Table The Italian Fast-Track Cities network: common actions
    14.40 - 14.45 Final considerations
    B. Audoin, A. d'Arminio Monforte
    14:50 - 15:50

    Symposium

    Long-COVID and HIV: which signatures?

    Symposium

    Long-COVID and HIV: which signatures?

    COVID-19 has the potential to affect people living with HIV (PLWH) in various ways, including be increased risk of COVID-19 acquisition and interruptions of HIV treatment and care. The purpose of this session is to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 among PLWH.  In particular to explore how different processes involving aging, inflammation, and cardiovascular risk may interact in HIV and SARS-CoV-2 co-infection, particularly the long-term effects generated by the collision of the two pandemics.

    Chairs: G. Guaraldi, E. Vicenzi

    14.50 - 15.05 Geroscience in long-COVID and HIV
    N. Barzilai
    15.05 - 15.20 Inflammaging in HIV & in long-Covid
    M. Montano
    15.20 - 15.30 Discussion
    15.30 - 15.40 Fat matters in HIV and COVID-19
    G. Besutti
    15.40 - 15.50 Physical activity as pleasure and medicine
    P.M. Cinque
    16:20 - 16:40

    Sessione

    SIMIT & ICAR-CROI Awards - Closing remarks

    SIMIT & ICAR-CROI Awards - Closing remarks

    Chairs: G.V. Calvino, M.R. Capobianchi, A.M. Cattelan, A. d'Arminio Monforte, C.M. Mastroianni, C. Mussini, G. Silvestri, M. Tavio, S. Vella

  • Polissena A Hall
    10:05 - 11:05

    Oral Communications

    Clinical HIV & Clinical COVID III

    Oral Communications

    Clinical HIV & Clinical COVID III

    Chairs: P.A. Grossi, E. Vaccher

    10.05 - 10.15

    OC 32

    T-Lymphocyte subset absolute counts assessed at baseline represent a useful tool to predict 30-days mortality in hospitalized SARS-CoV-2 infected patients
    A. Di Lorenzo, M. Iannetta, P.G. Pace, I. Spalliera, B. Rossi, P. Vitale, S. Tedde, L. Ansaldo, L. Campogiani, C. Picarelli, V. Malagnino, E. Teti, M.Andreoni, L. Sarmati
    Department of System Medicine, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy; Infectious Disease Clinic, Policlinico Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy

    10.17 - 10.27

    OC 33

    HIV and SARS-CoV-2 co-infection: protective role of IL-10 in HIV-positive young individuals
    C. Vanetti1,2, D. Trabattoni2, M. Stracuzzi3, A. Amendola4,5, C. Fappani4,5, V. Rubinacci3, C. Fenizia2, M. Biasin2, E. Longoni3, A. Dighera3, I. Saulle1,2, F. Ardizzone2, E. Tanzi4,5, M. Clerici1,6, G.V. Zuccotti2,7, V. Giacomet4
    1Chair of Immunology - Department of of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, 2Chair of Immunology, DIBIC L. Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, 3Paediatric Infectious Disease Unit, Ospedale L. Sacco, Milan, 4Department of Biomedical Sciences for Health, University of Milan, Milan, 5Coordinated Research Center “EpiSoMI”, University of Milan, Milan, 6IRCCS Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi, Milan, 7Department of Pediatrics, Ospedale dei Bambini V. Buzzi, Milan

    10.29 - 10.39

    OC 34

    Sequelae at 12 months after COVID-19 in hospitalized adults: a multicenter study
    A. Comelli1, G. Viero2, G. Bettini2, A. Nobili3, M. Tettamanti3, A.A. Galbussera3, A. Muscatello1, M. Mantero2,4, C. Canetta5, P. Bonfanti6, M. Contoli7, A. Gori1,2, A. Bandera1,2 for the COVID-19 Network
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, Foundation IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy, 2University of Milan, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Milan, Italy, 3Institute for Pharmacological Research Mario Negri IRCCS, Milan, Italy, 4Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Respiratory Unit and Cystic Fibrosis Adult Centre, Internal Medicine Department, Milan, Italy, 5Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Acute Medical Unit, Milan, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Unit, Azienda Socio Sanitaria Territoriale (ASST) Monza, San Gerardo Hospital, Monza, Italy, 7Research Centre on Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy

    10.41 - 10.51

    OC 35

    Bloodstream infections in COVID-19 patients: first-wave versus second-wave comparison
    L. Tartaglione1, A. Pani2, S. Nerini Molteni1, N. Ughi3, J. Colombo4, M. Merli5, T. Langer4, G. Monti4, F.Di Ruscio6, E. Inglese1, A. Bielli1, G. Casalicchio1, A. Nava1, D. Fanti1, M. Puoti5, R. Fumagalli4,7, O.M. Epis3, F. Scaglione1, C. Vismara1, V. Cento2
    1Chemical-Clinical and Microbiological Analyses, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 2Department of Oncology and Hemato-Oncology, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy, 3Rheumatology Unit, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 4Department of Anesthesiology, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 5Infectious Diseases, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 6Residency in Microbiology and Virology, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy, 7School of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan

    10.53 - 11.03

    OC 36

    Impact of a pro-active Infectious Diseases Consultation for the Management of a Multidrug-resistant Organisms Outbreak in a COVID-19 Hospital: a Three-Months Quasi-Experimental Prospective Study
    D.F. Bavaro1, N. De Gennaro1, A. Belati1, L. Diella1, R. Papagni1, L. Frallonardo1, M. Camporeale1, G. Guido1, C. Pellegrino1, M. Marrone2, A. Dell’Erba2, L. Gesualdo3, N.Brienza4, S. Grasso4, G. Columbo4, A. Moschetta5, E. Carpagnano6, A. Daleno7, A.M. Minicucci7, G. Migliore8, A. Saracino1
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Bari, Italy, 2Interdisciplinary Department of Medicine, University of Bari – Section of Legal Medicine, Bari General Hospital, Bari, Italy, 3Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation Unit, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy, 4Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, Section of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Bari, Italy, 5Department of Interdisciplinary Medicine, University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Bari, Italy, 6Department of Basic Medical Science, Institute of Respiratory Disease, Neuroscience, and Sense Organs, University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Bari, Italy, 7Section of Health Management, Policlinico Hospital, Bari, Italy, 8General Direction, Policlinico Hospital, Bari, Italy

    11:10 - 12:10

    Oral Communications

    Immunopathogenesis I

    Oral Communications

    Immunopathogenesis I

    Chairs: G. d'Ettorre, G. Nunnari

    11.10 - 11.25 The age-dependent B-cell response to SARS-CoV-2 between innate and adaptive memory
    R. Carsetti
    11.25 - 11.40 Pregnancy and Sars-Cov-2: a novel virus in a unique population
    M. Biasin
    11.40 - 11.50

    OC 37

    SARS-CoV-2 plasmatic viremia and T-cell immune response in hospitalized COVID-19 patients
    R. Rovito, V. Bono, M. Augello, C. Tincati, F. Bai, M. Allegrini, M. Hadla, A. d’Arminio Monforte, G. Marchetti
    Clinic of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine San Paolo Hospital, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy

    11.52 - 12.02

    OC 38

    T-lymphocyte specific response to SARS-CoV-2 peptides is detectable in patients with multiple sclerosis under treatment with disease modifying therapies, despite absent or low-level anti-Spike antibody titers. Which are the possible clinical implications?
    M. Iannetta1, D. Landi2, G. Cola2, A. Di Lorenzo1, L. Campogiani1, I. Spalliera1, P. Vitale1, V. Malagnino1, E. Teti1, L. Coppola1, D. Fraboni3, F. Buccisano3, S. Grelli4, G.A. Marfia2,5, M. Andreoni1, L. Sarmati1
    1Infectious Disease Unit, Department of System Medicine, Tor Vergata University and Hospital, Rome, Italy, 2Multiple Sclerosis Clinical and Research Unit, Department of Systems Medicine, Tor Vergata University and Hospital, Rome, Italy, 3Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, Tor Vergata University and Hospital, Rome, Italy, 4Virology Unit, Department of Experimental Medicine, Tor Vergata University and Hospital, Rome, Italy, 5Unit of Neurology, IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo NEUROMED, Pozzilli (Is), Italy

    12:15 - 13:15

    Oral Communications

    Comorbidities I

    Oral Communications

    Comorbidities I

    Chairs: P. Nasta, G. Parruti

    12.15 - 12.30 Into the lung: is there a synergy between HIV and SARS-CoV2?
    A. Di Biagio
    12.30 - 12.40

    OC 39

    SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 disease in a large cohort of PLWHIV
    F. Maggiolo1, D. Valenti2, M. Arosio1, L. Goisis1, D. Guarneri1 ,M. Rizzi1, A.P. Callegaro1
    1ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, 2Associazione FROM, Bergamo

    12.42 - 12.52

    OC 40

    Meningococcus B Vaccination Effectiveness against Neisseria gonorrhoeae Infection in PLWH: a Case-control Study
    A.R. Raccagni1, A. Poli2, L. Galli2, V. Spagnuolo1, 2, E. Bruzzesi1, C. Muccini2, S. Bossolasco2, M. Ranzenigo1, N. Gianotti2, I. Mainardi1, A. Castagna1, 2, S. Nozza2
    1Vita-Salute San Raffaele University - Milan (Italy), 2Infectious Diseases Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute - Milan (Italy)

    12.54 - 13.04

    OC 41

    A Machine Learning-Based Model to Predict the 15-Year Risk for Cardiovascular Disease in a Cohort of People Living with HIV
    C. Muccini1,2, C. Masci3, F. Corso3, L. Galli1, A. Poli1, M. Ranzenigo2, R. Monardo2, A.M. Paganoni3,4, A. Castagna1,2, F. Ieva3,4
    1Department of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, 2Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy, 3MOX Laboratory for Modeling and Scientific Computing - Department of Mathematics, Milan, Italy, 4Centre for Analysis, Decision and Society (CADS), Human Technopole, Milan, Italy

    14:15 - 14:45

    Oral Communications

    Antiretroviral Therapy II

    Oral Communications

    Antiretroviral Therapy II

    Chairs: A.M. Cattelan, N. Gianotti

    14.15 - 14.25

    OC 47

    Associations between weight changes and plasmatic pro-inflammatory cytokines in PLWH following ART initiation: data from the ICONA cohort
    F. Bai1, A. Tavelli2, A. Cozzi-Lepri3, M. Hadla1, S. Cicalini4, D. Vincenti2, E. Quiros Roldan5, E. Schiaroli2, P. Meraviglia6, L. Taramasso7, G. Guaraldi8, A. d’Arminio Monforte1, G. Marchetti1, N. Gianotti9
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, San Paolo Hospital, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, 2Icona Foundation, Milan, 3Institute for Global Health, University College London, London, 4HIV/AIDS Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases, IRCCS, Lazzaro Spallanzani, Rome, 5University Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, 6Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco University Hospital, Milan, 7Infectious Diseases Unit, Ospedale Policlinico San Martino - IRCCS, Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa, Genoa, 8Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences for Adults and Children, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena,
    9Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan

    14.27 - 14.37

    OC 48

    Weight gain after switching from efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (EFV/FTC/TDF) to bictegravir/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide (BIC/FTC/TAF) in patient with stable viral suppression
    S. Cicalini, P. Lorenzini, E. Grilli, S. Ottou, M.M. Plazzi, F. De Zottis, M. Camici, M. Fusto, R. Gagliardini, R. Bellagamba, A. Antinori
    National Institute for Infectious Diseases "Lazzaro Spallanzani", IRCCS, Rome

    14:50 - 16:20

    Oral Communications

    Antiretroviral Therapy III

    Oral Communications

    Antiretroviral Therapy III

    Chairs: S. Cicalini, C. Torti

    14.50 - 15.00

    OC 53

    Effectiveness of lamivudine + dolutegravir (3TC+DTG) in persons living with HIV (PLWH) starting their first antiretroviral treatment
    A. Cozzi-Lepri1, A. Vergori2, S. Lo Caputo3, A. Cingolani4, F. Ceccehrini-Silberstein5, R. Gagliardini2, M. Lichtner6, A. Calcagno7, G. Madeddu8, A. Castagna9, A. d’Arminio Monforte10, A. Antinori2 on behalf of the Icona Foundation Study cohort
    1IGH, University College London, UK, 2INMI Lazzaro Spallanzani, Roma, Italy, 3Università di Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 4Policlinico Gemelli, Roma, Italy, 5Università di Tor Vergata, Roma, Italy, 6Università La Sapienza, Roma, Italy, 7Università di Torino, Torino, Italy, 8Università degli Studi di Sassari, Sassari, Italy, 9San Raffaele Hospital, Milano, Italy, 10San Paolo Hospital, Milano, Italy

    15.02 - 15.12

    OC 54

    Reasons for choosing a TAF-based 3DR instead of a DTG-based 2DR as ART switch strategy for virologically suppressed PLWH in Italy
    A. Vergori1, A. Cozzi-Lepri2, A. Tavelli3, S. Lo Caputo4, E. Quiros-Roldan5, G. De Girolamo6, F. Bai7, C. Mussini8, A. Di Biagio9, L. Sarmati10, A. Antinori1, A. d’Arminio Monforte7 for Icona Foundation Study Group
    1HIV/AIDS Clinical Department, "Lazzaro Spallanzani"-IRCCS, National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Rome, Italy, 2Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation (CREME) Institute for Global Health UCL, London, UK, 3Icona Foundation, Milan, Italy, 4Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 5Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia and ASST Spedali Civili Hospital, Brescia, Italy, 6Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 7Department of Health Sciences, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, ASST Santi Paolo E Carlo, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 8Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 9Infectious Diseases Unit, San Martino Policlinico Hospital – IRCCS, Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy, 10Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Rome Tor Vergata, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy

    15.14 - 15.24

    OC 55

    An Italian non-interventional retrospective and prospective study in HIV-positive adult outpatients treated with D/C/F/TAF: the DIAMANTE study
    A. Antinori1, D. Ripamonti2, G. Rizzardini3, S. Rusconi4,5, V. Esposito6, A. Cascio7, G. Orofino8, M. Andreoni9, E. Manzillo10, A. Castagna11,12, D. Mancusi13, M. Portaro13, A. Uglietti13, R. Termini13
    1HIV/AIDS Unit, National Institute for Infectious Diseases L. Spallanzani, IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2Infectious Diseases Clinic, Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Bergamo, Italy, 31st Division of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milano, Italy, 4DIBIC Luigi Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 5Infectious Diseases Unit, Legnano Hospital ASST Ovest Milanese, 6Infectious Diseases and Gender Medicine Unit D. Cotugno Hospital- AO dei Colli Naples,Italy, 7Infectious Diseases Clinic, AOU Policlinico “P.Giaccone”, Palermo, Italy, 8Amedeo di Savoia Hospital Unit of Infectious Diseases Torino, Italy, 9Infectious Diseases Clinic, Foundation Policlinico Tor Vergata University Hospital, Rome, Italy, 10Infectious Disease and Infectious Emergencies, Azienda Ospedaliera dei Colli, Naples, Italy, 11IRCSS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Infectious Diseases, Milan, Italy, 12Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy, 13Medical Affairs Department, Infectious Disease and Vaccines, Janssen-Cilag SpA, Cologno Monzese, Italy

    15.26 - 15.36

    OC 56

    Prevalence, characteristics and outcome of Heavily treated experienced (HTE) HIV-infected patients: data from the Italian ICONA Cohort
    S. Lo Caputo1, A. Tavellli2, R. Gagliardini3, S. Rusconi4, G. Lapadula5, A. Antinori3, D. Francisci6, L. Sarmati7, A. Gori8, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein9, A. d'Arminio Monforte10, A. Cozzi-Lepri11 on behalf of Icona Foundation Study Group
    1University of Foggia, Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Foggia, Italy, 2Icona Foundation, Milan, Italy, 3INMI L Spallanzani IRCC, HIV/AIDS Department, Rome, Italy, 4ASST Ovest Milanese Ospedale di Legnano, University of Milan, Department of Infectious Diseases, Legnano, Italy, 5ASST Monza, University of Milano-Bicocca, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Monza, Italy, 6University of Perugia, Department of Medicine and Surgery, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Perugia, Italy, 7Policlinico Tor Vergata, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Department of System Medicine, Infectious Disease Clinic, Rome, Italy, 8Foundation IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, University of Milan, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Infectious Diseases Unit, Milan, Italy, 9University of Rome Tor Vergata, Department of Experimental Medicine, Rome, Italy, 10University of Milan, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Health Sciences, Milan, Italy, 11UCL, Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation, Institute for Global Health, London, United Kingdom

    15.38 - 15.48

    OC 57

    BIC/FTC/TAF is effective on PLWH with low CD4 counts: real-life data from the Icona cohort
    A. d’Arminio Monforte1, A. Tavelli2, F. Maggiolo3, A. Castagna4, F. Ceccherini Silbertein5, A. Cozzi-Lepri6, E. Girardi7, S. Lo Caputo8, C. Mussini9, M. Puoti10, A. Gori11, A. Antinori12 for Icona Foundation Study Group
    1Department of Health Sciences, Clinic of Infectious Disease, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 2Icona Foundation, Milan, Italy, 3Infectious Diseases, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 4Department of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, University Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy, 5Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, 6Centre for Clinical Research, Epidemiology, Modelling and Evaluation (CREME), Institute for Global Health, UCL, London, UK, 7Department of Epidemiology and Pre-Clinical Research, National Institute for Infectious Diseases L. Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 8Infectious Diseaes Department, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy, 9Infectious Diseases Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico di Modena, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 10Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Grande Ospedale Metropolitano Niguarda, Milan, Italy, 11Infectious Diseases Unit, Foundation IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 12HIV/AIDS Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases L. Spallanzani, Rome, Italy

    15.50 - 16.00

    OC 58

    ART switch for pro-active, re-active or cost-saving reasons: a real world evaluation of the determinants over the period 2017-2020 in the Veneto Region
    A.M. Cattelan1, A. Cozzi-Lepri2, M. Mazzitelli1,3, M. Malena4, L. Sasset1, P. Rovere5, V. Manfrin6, R. Ferretto5, M. Fiscon4, M. Vincenzi5, G. Battagin6, I. Coledan7, L. Da Ros8, M. Lanzafame7 for the Veneto Collaborative Group
    1Azienda Ospedale Università Padova, 2UCL, London, UK, 3Magna Graecia University of Catanzaro, 4U.O.S.D. Centro Malattie Diffusive ULSS 9 Verona, 5U.O. Malattie Infettive Ospedale “Mater Salutis” Legnago, 6U.O. Malattie Infettive e Tropicali Ospedale S. Bortolo Vicenza, 7U.O. Malattie Infettive A.O.U.I. Verona, 8Fondazione Smith Kline
    Other members of Veneto Collaborative Group: S. Panese, U.O. Malattie Infettive Ospedale dell’Angelo Mestre (VE), M.G. Cecchetto, U.O. Malattie Infettive Ospedale "Santa Maria della Misericordia" Rovigo, C. Granata, U.O. Malattie Infettive Ospedale San Martino di Belluno, P. Scotton, M.C. Rossi, U.O. Malattie Infettive Ospedale Ca' Foncello Treviso

    16.02 - 16.12

    OC 59

    Switching to Emtricitabile/Tenofovir Alafenamide/Bictegravir on metabolic and hepatic safety: preliminary data from Surveillance Cohort Long-term Toxicity Antiretrovirals/antivirals (SCOLTA) project
    N. Squillace1, E. Ricci2, B. Menzaghi3, G.V. De Socio4, G. Orofino5, B.M. Celesia6, F. Vichi7, A. Di Biagio8, L. Taramasso8, C. Molteni9, E. Sarchi10, L. Valsecchi11, G.F. Pellicanò12, P. Bonfanti1, for the CISAI Study Group
    1Infectious Diseases Unit ASST-MONZA, San Gerardo Hospital-University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, 2Fondazione ASIA Onlus, Buccinasco, Milano, Italy, 3Unit of Infectious Diseases, ASST della Valle Olona, Busto Arsizio, Varese, 4Unit of Infectious Diseases, Santa Maria Hospital, Perugia, 5Division I of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, ASL Città di Torino, 6Unit of Infectious Diseases, Garibaldi Hospital, Catania, 7Unit of Infectious Diseases, Santa Maria Annunziata Hospital, Florence, 8Infectious Diseases, San Martino Hospital Genoa, University of Genoa, Genoa, 9Unit of Infectious Diseases, A. Manzoni Hospital, Lecco, 10Infectious Diseases Unit, S.Antonio e Biagio e Cesare Arrigo Hospital, Alessandria, Italy, 111st Department of Infectious Diseases, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milan, Italy, 12Infectious Diseases, G. Martino Hospital University of Messina, Messina

  • Polissena B Hall
    10:05 - 11:05

    Expert Meeting

    Hepatitis D virus in 2021: new challenges in tough-to-treat patients

    Expert Meeting

    Hepatitis D virus in 2021: new challenges in tough-to-treat patients

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV), first discovered in Italy in 1977, is a small defective RNA virus which requires the helper function of HBV for its replication and transmission to anti-HDV-negative individuals. HDV infection can be transmitted either simultaneously with HBV infection (co-infection) or to people who are already chronic HBV carriers (super-infection). It has been estimated that 15-20 million people worldwide have a chronic HDV infection; in Italy prevalence is estimated around 7-8% among HBV infected people. Coinfections lead to more serious liver disease than hepatitis B infection alone. They are associated with faster progression to liver fibrosis, increased risk of liver cancer, and early decompensated cirrhosis and liver failure. Up to 90% of superinfected individuals will develop chronic infections of both hepatitis B and delta, of which approximately 70% will progress to cirrhosis (liver scarring), compared to 15-30% of those infected only with the hepatitis B virus. Until now, people with HDV had very limited treatment options and poor diagnosis. The Expert Meeting will focus on a new agent - bulevirtide - a first-in-class HBV and HDV entry inhibitor that targets the human NTCP (sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide) transmembrane protein.

    Chair: N. Coppola

    10.05 - 10.10 Introduction
    N. Coppola
    10.10 - 10.30 Current challenges in Hepatitis D: epidemiology, diagnosis and management 44 years after discovery
    M.R. Brunetto
    10.30 - 10.50 A new option for the treatment of chronic hepatitis delta: scientific evidence of the first-in-class entry inhibitor Bulevirtide
    P. Lampertico
    10.50 - 11.00 Discussion
    11.00 - 11.05 Take-home messages and conclusions
    N. Coppola
    11:10 - 12:10

    Expert Meeting

    Remdesivir from the pivotal trials to the real world experiences: are there other open questions?

    Con la sponsorizzazione di:

    Expert Meeting

    Remdesivir from the pivotal trials to the real world experiences: are there other open questions?

    The use of remdesivir, the first and only antiviral drug authorized in Europe for the treatment of COVID-19, is increasingly supported by numerous real-world data, which confirm the results of three randomized and controlled clinical trials, including the ACTT-1 study, the gold standard randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial on the efficacy of remdesivir. While in these studies no benefit on mortality rates or a non-statistically significant trend towards benefit for mortality were reported, the results of recent international real-world retrospective analyses on large data sets complete the picture provided by the randomized and controlled clinical trials, showing that hospitalised COVID-19 patients treated with remdesivir had a statistically significant reduction in mortality and improved survival compared to matched controls. These robust findings have been observed not only in the overall population but also across all subgroups of patients requiring supplemental oxygen.The meeting will be an opportunity to present a scientific update on the efficacy data and to share opinions and experiences about a year after the introduction of remdesivir in clinical practice in Italy.The Expert Meeting will be carried out through an interactive discussion between young and experienced infectious disease specialists, who will talk about their experience on the use of remdesivir in clinical practice.

    Moderatore: S. Rusconi

    Discussants: F.G. De Rosa, M. Falcone, T.A. Santantonio, F.S. Serino

    11.10 - 11.15 COVID-19: Remdesivir from the pivotal trials to the real-world experience
    S. Rusconi
    11.15 - 11.30 Remdesivir from the clinical trials to the real Practice: the open questions
    T.A. Santantonio
    11.30 - 11.45 Evidence from the real-world analyses: the initial answers
    F.G. De Rosa
    11.45 - 12.05 Interactive discussion. Round table: The answers from the experts
    12.05 - 12.10 Closure
    S. Rusconi
    12:15 - 13:15

    Oral Communications

    Immunopathogenesis II

    Oral Communications

    Immunopathogenesis II

    Chairs: V. Borghi, A. Callegaro

    12.15 - 12.25

    OC 42

    The interplay between SARS-CoV-2 infected airway epithelium and immune cells modulates the immunoregulatory/inflammatory signals
    V. Bordoni1, G. Matusali1, D. Mariotti1, M. Antonioli1, E. Cimini1, A. Sacchi1, E. Tartaglia1, R. Casetti1, G. Grassi1, S. Notari1, C. Castilletti1, G.M. Fimia1,2, G. Ippolito1, C. Agrati1
    1National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani-IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Rome, Italy

    12.27 - 12.37

    OC 43

    Detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA and evaluation of neurofilament light chain in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of COVID-19 patients
    M. A. Zingaropoli1, M. Iannetta2, P. Lorenzo3, P. Pasculli1, L. Mazzuti4, R. Scutari3, M. Antonacci1, L. Campogiani2, G. Antonelli4, M. Andreoni2, C. M. Mastroianni1, O. Turriziani4, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein3, L. Sarmati2, M.R. Ciardi1
    1Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza, University of Rome, 2Department of Systems Medicine, Tor Vergata, University of Rome, 3Department of Experimental Medicine, Tor Vergata, University of Rome, 4Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza, University of Rome

    12.39 - 12.49

    OC 44

    MMP-9 and TIMP-1 as a potential disease biomarker in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia
    M. A. Zingaropoli1, P. Pasculli1, T. Latronico2, V. Pierri1, R. Merz1, F. Fornasiere1, P. Nijhawan1, M. Lichtner1, G. M. Liuzzi2, M. R. Ciardi1, C. M. Mastroianni1
    1Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza, University of Rome, 2Department of Biosciences, Biotechnology and Biopharmaceutics, Aldo Moro University, Bari, Italy

    12.51 - 13.01

    OC 45

    An NF-kB/Jak/Stat signaling pathways is involved in APOBEC3A induction following CCL2 neutralization in primary human macrophages
    D.A. Covino1, L. Catapano1, I. Farina1, S. Sozzi1, F. Spadaro2, S. Cecchetti2, C. Purificato1, M.C. Gauzzi1, L. Fantuzzi1
    1National Center for Global Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy, 2Core Facilities, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy

    13.03 - 13.13

    OC 46

    Oral mucosal immunity in SARS-CoV-2 infected and/or vaccined subjects
    M. Garziano1,2 , O. Utyro1, G. Cappelletti1, F. Limanaqi1,2, C. Fenizia1,2, D. Trabattoni1, M. Clerici2,3, M. Biasin1
    1Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche e Cliniche “L. Sacco”, Milan, Italy, 2Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Medico-Chirurgica e dei Trapianti, Milan, Italy, 3Don C. Gnocchi Foundation, IRCCS, Milano, Italy

    14:15 - 14:45

    Oral Communications

    Comorbidities II

    Oral Communications

    Comorbidities II

    Chair: M. Borderi

    14.15 - 14.25

    OC 49

    Viral dynamics in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy
    M. Negri1, I. Mainardi1, A. Tarantino1, S. Gerevini2, R. Vercesi1, R. Caccia1, F. Turrini1, A. Boschini3, S. Bossolasco1, H. Hasson1, A. Castagna1, P. Cinque1
    1Unit of Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Scentific Institute, Milano, 2Unit of Neuroradiology, Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Bergamo, 3San Patrignano Medical Centre, Ospitaletto di Rimini

    14.27 - 14.37

    OC 50

    Switching to INSTI offsets negative effects of weight gain on incidence of insulin resistance in people living with HIV
    J. Milic1,2, S. Renzetti3, D. Ferrari1, S. Barbieri1, M. Menozzi2,4, G. Cuomo2,4, F. Carli2,4, G. Dolci2,4, G. Ciusa2,4, V. Iadisernia2,4, D. Yaacoub2,4, G. Burastero2,4, E. Bacca2,4, C. Mussini1,4, S. Calza4, G. Guaraldi1,2,4
    1Department of Surgical, Medical, Dental and Morphological Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy, 2Modena HIV Metabolic Clinic (MHMC), University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy, 3Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Italy, 4Department of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Policlinico of Modena, Modena, Italy

    14:50 - 16:20

    Oral Communications

    Virology and Pharmacology II

    Oral Communications

    Virology and Pharmacology II

    Chairs: S. Parisi, O. Turriziani

    14.50 - 15.05 An update on the pharmacological strategies in the treatment of viral infections
    S. Bonora
    15.05 - 15.20 Pharmacology as a tool for polypharmacy management in HIV
    C. Gervasoni
    15.20 - 15.30

    OC 60

    Evaluation of factors potentially associated with Low-level viremia in PLWH from the Italian ARCA cohort: a matched Case-Control Study
    F. Lombardi1, Y. Bouba2, D. Di Carlo3, V. Costabile4, E. Bruzzesi5, M. Ranzenigo5, F. Maggiolo6, A.P. Callegaro7, A. Zoncada8, S. Paolucci9, V. Micheli10, S. Renica3, A. Bezencheck11,12, B. Rossetti13, M.M. Santoro14
    1UOC Malattie Infettive, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 2Chantal BIYA International Reference Centre for research on HIV/AIDS prevention and management (CIRCB), Yaoundé, Cameroon, 3CRC Pediatric "Romeo and Enrica Invernizzi", Department of Biosciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 4Department of Oncology and Hemato-oncology, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 5Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy, 6Department of Infectious Diseases, Azienda Ospedaliera Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 7Department of Laboratory Medicine, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 8UO Malattie Infettive, ASST Cremona, Cremona, Italy, 9Molecular Virology Unit, Division of Microbiology and Virology, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy, 10Department of Clinical Microbiology Virology and Diagnosis of Bioemergency, Luigi Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy, 11IPRO - InformaPRO S.r.l., Rome, Italy, 12EuResist Network GEIE, Rome, Italy, 13Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Medical Sciences, University Hospital of Siena, Siena, Italy, 14Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy

    15.32 - 15.42

    OC 61

    Distribution of tenofovir plasma trough concentrations in PLWH treated with doravirine
    D. Cattaneo, M. Fusi, V. Micheli, C. Resnati, P. Meraviglia, M.V. Cossu, S. Vimercati, C.G. Bisinella, S. Baldelli, S. Antinori, C. Gervasoni
    ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco University Hospital, Milano, Italy

    15.44 - 15.54

    OC 62

    SNP-168 of the protein kinase and CD4 or CD8 dynamic in HIV-1 patients
    C. Brombin1,2, S. Bagaglio3, A. Castagna2,3, C. Uberti-Foppa2,3, S. Salpietro3, C. Di Serio1,2, G. Morsica3
    1University Centre for Statistics in the Biomedical Sciences (CUSSB), Milano, Italy, 2Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milano, Italy, 3Department of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy

    15.56 - 16.06

    OC 63

    Interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics of the remdesivir and main metabolite GS-441524 in treated COVID-19 subjects
    M. Tempestilli1, T. Ascoli-Bartoli2, L. Lepore2, L. Marchioni2, E. Nicastri2, C. Agrati1
    1Cellular Immunology and Pharmacology Laboratory, National Institute for Infectious Diseases “L. Spallanzani” I.R.C.C.S., Rome, Italy, 2Clinical Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases “L. Spallanzani” I.R.C.C.S., Rome, Italy

    16.08 - 16.18

    OC 64

    Temporal trend of drug-resistance and APOBEC editing in PBMC genotypic resistance tests on isolates with contextual undetectable HIV-1 plasma viral load performed for clinical routine
    D. Armenia1, V. Cento2, C. Alteri2,3, V. Borghi4, R. Gagliardini5, A. Vergori5, F. Forbici5, A. Bertoli6,7, W. Gennari4, V. Malagnino7, M. Andreoni7, C. Mussini4, A. Antinori5, C.F. Perno3, F. Ceccherini-Silberstein6, M.M. Santoro6
    1UniCamillus, Saint Camillus International University of Health Sciences, Rome, Italy, 2University of Milan, Milan, Italy, 3Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, Rome, Italy, 4University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, 5National Institute for Infectious Diseases L. Spallanzani, IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 6University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy, 7Polyclinic of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome Italy

  • Room 3
    10:05 - 11:05

    Special Session

    Riunione operativa Fast-Track

    Special Session

    Riunione operativa Fast-Track

    11:10 - 12:10

    Meet the Community

    Sex Check for Prep

    Meet the Community

    Sex Check for Prep

    Chair: V. Puro

    11.10 - 12.10 Sex Check for Prep
    S. Mattioli
    14:15 - 14:45

    Oral Communications

    Virology and Pharmacology I

    Oral Communications

    Virology and Pharmacology I

    Chairs: D. Cattaneo, M. Santoro

    14.15 - 14.25

    OC 51

    Virological and Serological Characterization of SARS-CoV-2 Infections Diagnosed After mRNA BNT162b2 Vaccination
    F. Colavita, S. Meschi, C. E. M. Gruber, M. Rueca, F. Vairo, G. Matusali, D. Lapa, E. Giombini, G. De Carli, M. Spaziante, F. Messina, G. Bonfiglio, F. Carletti, E. Lalle, L. Fabeni, G. Berno, V. Puro, A. Di Caro, B. Bartolini, G. Ippolito, M.R. Capobianchi, C. Castilletti, on behalf of INMI Covid-19 laboratory surveillance team
    National Institute for Infectious Diseases “Lazzaro Spallanzani” IRCCS, Rome, Italy

    14.27 - 14.37

    OC 52

    Cross-neutralization of SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7 and P.1 variants in vaccinated, convalescent and P.1 infected
    A. Gidari1, S. Sabbatini2, S. Bastianelli1, S. Pierucci1, C. Busti1, C. Monari2, B. Luciani Pasqua3, F. Dragoni4, E. Schiaroli1, M. Zazzi4, D. Francisci1
    1Department of Medicine and Surgery, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, “Santa Maria della Misericordia” Hospital, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy, 2Department of Medicine and Surgery, Medical Microbiology Section, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy, 3Centro Regionale Sangue, Servizio Immunotrasfusionale, Azienda Ospedaliera di Perugia, Perugia, Italy, 4Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy

    14:50 - 16:20

    Oral Communications

    Epidemiology/Social sciences IV

    Oral Communications

    Epidemiology/Social sciences IV

    Chairs: P. Bonfanti, G. Verucchi

    14.50 - 15.00

    OC 65

    Interest in injecting Long-Acting agents by people living with HIV in Italy: a picture from the Icona Network
    A. Cingolani1, A. Tavelli2, F. Maggiolo3, A. Perziano4, A. Saracino5, F. Vichi6, M. Cernuschi7, G. Guaraldi8, E. Quiros Roldan9, A. Castagna7, A. Antinori10, A. d’Arminio Monforte11 on behalf of Icona Network
    1Infectious Diseases Unit, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli - Università Cattolica Del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy, 2Icona Foundation, Milan, Italy, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy, 4For CAB Icona Associazione Arcobaleno AIDS ODV, Torino, Italy, 5University of Bari "Aldo Moro," Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Bari, Italy, 6Infectious Diseases Unit 1, Santa Maria Annunziata Hospital, Azienda USL Toscana Centro, Florence, Italy, 7Department of Infectious Diseases, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, University Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy, 8Department of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Modena, University Hospital of Modena, Modena, Italy, 9University Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia, ASST Spedali Civili, Brescia, Italy, 10HIV/AIDS Department, INMI, L. Spallanzani, IRCCS, Rome, Italy, 11Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milan, Italy

    15.02 - 15.12

    OC 66

    Milan Fast Track City: study on HIV prevalence in two different settings
    A. d’Arminio Monforte1, A. Tavelli1, D. Barbanotti1, G. Pigliapochi2, A. Ruggeri2, R. Repossi2, D. Calzavara2, A. de Bona1, T. Bini1, C. Tincati1, R. Rossotti2, M. Cernuschi2
    1Clinic of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Department of Heath Sciences, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, Milano, 2Milan Check Point, Milan

    15.14 - 15.24

    OC 67

    Impact of COVID-19 on HIV testing and counselling services in Lazio Region
    N.Orchi1, A. Navarra2, R. Esvann1, F. Gili1, S. Pittalis2, V. Puro1, for the Regional Group of HIV testing and counselling sites3
    1Regional AIDS Reference Center, National Institute for Infectious Diseases L. Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 2Clinical Epidemiology Unit, National Institute for Infectious Diseases L. Spallanzani, Rome, Italy, 3Regional Group of HIV testing and counselling sites

    15.26 - 15.36

    OC 68

    Estimation of the proportion of people living with HIV in ART and virally suppressed, using surveillance and cohort data. Italy, 2012-2019
    L. Timelli1, A. Navarra1, P. Piselli1, V. Regine2, A. Mammone3, A. Caraglia3, L. Pugliese2, M. Oldrini5, L. Rancilio6, L. Cosmaro5, M. Farinella7, A. Tavelli4, A. d'Arminio Monforte4, B. Suligoi2, E. Girardi1
    1Istituto Nazionale per le Malattie Infettive "Lazzaro Spallanzani"- IRCCS, Roma, 2Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Roma, 3Ministero della Salute, Roma, 4Fondazione ICONA, Milano, 5Fondazione LILA Milano, Milano, 6Caritas Ambrosiana, Milano, 7Circolo Mario Mieli, Roma

    15.38 - 15.48

    OC 69

    Prevalence of HIV infection in the PIPSA project carried out in Luanda, Angola. Data analysis by sex and age group
    G. Natali1, F. Cavallin2, T.S.S. Almeida3, T. Lomba Jamba4, T. Baldoni1, S. Rocca1, P. João5, M. Miguel5, L. Nigro5,6 for the PIPSA Group. The PIPSA Group: E. Do Nascimento, M. Silvestre, J. Bengui, M. Cardoso, S. Da Silva, U. Fernandes, M. Fundumuca, B. Gaspar, P. Kalandula, T. Mambo, C. Salvador, R. Salvador, J. Vemba, N. Cardoso.
    1Unione Medico Missionaria Italiana, Negrar, Italy, 2Independent Statistician, Solagna, Italy, 3Gabineto Provincial de Saúde, Luanda, Angola, 4Repartição Municipal de Saúde, Kilamba Kiaxi, Luanda, Angola, 5Cuamm - Medicos com Africa, Luanda, Angola, 6LHIVE Diritti e Prevenzione, Catania, Italy

    15.50 - 16.00

    OC 70

    High prevalence of mental health disorders in HIV positive adolescents and youths: an observational study from 8 health services in Beira district, Mozambique
    F. Di Gennaro1,2, A. Pozniak3, L. Ramirez4, H. Cardoso4, A. Chivite4, V. Cinturao4, D.F. Bavaro1, N. Chimundi4, C. Marotta2, I. Chaguruca4, F. Tognon2, E. Namarime4, E. Occa4, G. Putoto2, A. Saracino1
    1Clinic of Infectious Diseases, University of Bari, University Hospital Policlinico, Bari, Italy, 2Operational Research Unit, Doctors with Africa CUAMM, Padua, Italy, 3Department of HIV Medicine, Chelsea & Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; Department Clinical Research, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK, 4Doctors with Africa CUAMM, Beira, Mozambique

    16.02 - 16.12

    OC 71

    High prevalence of asymptomatic Sars-Cov2 infection in the cohort of Liver Transplant Recipients at INMI Spallanzani
    U. Visco-Comandini1, C. Castilletti2, R. Lionetti1, M. Montalbano1, A. Rianda1, C. Taibi1, C. Sorace1, S. Meschi2, N.Guglielmo3, P. Paci4, G.M. Ettorre3, G. D’Offizi1
    Polo Ospedaliero Interaziendale Trapianti POIT 1UOC Malattie infettive Epatologia, INMI L. Spallanzani, 2Laboratorio di Virologia, INMI Spallanzani, 3UOC Chirurgia Oncologica e dei Trapianti d'Organo, Az Ospedaliera San Camillo, 4Dipartimento di Ingegneria Informatica, Automatica e Gestionale "A. Ruberti" Università di Roma La Sapienza

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